Fellows
Fellows
nobel prize
presidential medal of freedom
american academy of arts and sciences
national medal of science
national humanities medal
Edgardo Buscaglia
Edgardo Buscaglia
research fellow until 2008

Expertise: Law and economics of crime

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Edgardo Buscaglia was a research fellow at the Hoover Institution until 2008. He is also the director of the International Law and Economic Development Center at the University of Virginia School of Law, the vice president of the Inter American Law and Economics Association, and a legal and economic senior adviser to several international organizations in the United States and in Europe.

Buscaglia studies the impact of legal and judicial frameworks on economic development. His current research focuses on factors affecting legal and economic integration in developing countries, the causes of public sector corruption, and intellectual property rights in developing countries. He also engages in economic analysis of the judicial sectors in civil law countries and in the implementation of technical assistance to countries focused on public sector institutional reforms, including improvements in public sector governance applied to central and local governments in Asia, Africa, and in Latin America. Additionally, Buscaglia is responsible for designing and delivering international economic and institutional assessments of organized crime linked to public sector corruption.

Some of his most recent peer-reviewed publications include "Controlling Organized Crime Linked to Public Sector Corruption: Results of a Global Trends Study" with Jan van Dijk (United Nations Forum, United Nations Press, 2003); "How to Design a National Strategy Against Organized Crime in the Framework of the United Nations' Palermo Convention" with Samuel Gonzalez-Ruiz in The Fight Against Organized Crime (UNDP Press, 2003); "Empirical Foundation for the Implementation of the Palermo Convention" with Jan van Dijk and Mark Shaw in Max Planck Journal (2002); "An Economic Analysis of Legal Harmonization in Latin America," in Emerging Markets Review (Elsevier Science Press, 2001); "An Economic Analysis of Institutional Integration in the Americas," in German Papers in Law and Economics (BCPress, 2001); "An Economic Analysis of Public Sector Corruption: Objective Indicators vs. Perceptional Biases," International Review of Law and Economics, June 2001; Law and Economics in Developing Countries with William Ratliff (Hoover Press, 2001); Judicial Corruption in Developing Countries: Its Causes and Economic Consequences (Hoover Essays in Public Policy, Hoover Press, 2000); "Law and Economics of Development" in the Encyclopedia of Law and Economics (Edward Elgar Press, 2000); "A Quantitative Analysis of the Efficiency of the Judicial Sector," International Review of Law and Economics, 1997; U.S. Foreign Policy and Intellectual Property Rights in Latin America with Clarisa Long (Hoover Essays in Public Policy, Hoover Press, 1997); "An Economic and Jurimetric Analysis of Public Sector Corruption," Essays in Law and Economics (Elgar Press, 1997); "Benchmarking Procedural Times: A Quality Control Approach to Court Delays" with J. L. Guerrero, Benchmarking for Quality Management & Technology, 1997.

Buscaglia is also the coeditor (with William Ratliff and Robert Cooter) of The Law and Economics of Development (JAI Press) and the coauthor (with William Ratliff) of Legal and Judicial Reforms in Latin America: Political and Economic Implications (1998). Buscaglia is an op-ed contributor to the Wall Street Journal, London's Financial Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Washington Times, and the Miami Herald.

Buscaglia served as a member of the board on Governance of Transparency International (an international anti-corruption alliance based in Berlin) and as a member of the board of directors at Analysis and Programming International Consulting Group.

Buscaglia has held teaching positions at Georgetown University, Washington College, the University of Ghent (Belgium), and the National University of Buenos Aires in Argentina.

Buscaglia received his legal postdoctoral training in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the University of California at Berkeley Law School. He also received a master's in law and economics and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was a Fulbright and ITT scholar between 1985 and 1989.