Benjamin Wittes

Benjamin Wittes

Biography: 

Benjamin Wittes is a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and codirector of the Harvard Law School–Brookings Project on Law and Security. His most recent publication is Speaking the Law (Hoover Institution Press 2013), cowritten with Kenneth Anderson. He is the author of Detention and Denial: The Case for Candor after Guantanamo, published in November 2011 by the Brookings Institution Press, and coeditor of Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change (forthcoming). He is also the author of Law and the Long War: The Future of Justice in the Age of Terror, published in June 2008 by Penguin Press, and the editor of the 2009 Brookings book Legislating the War on Terror: An Agenda for Reform. He cofounded and cowrites the Lawfare blog (http://www.lawfareblog.com/), which is devoted to nonideological discussions of hard national security choices, and is a member of the Hoover Institution's Task Force on National Security and Law.

His previous books include Starr: A Reassessment, published in 2002 by Yale University Press, and Confirmation Wars: Preserving Independent Courts in Angry Times, published in 2006 by Rowman & Littlefield and the Hoover Institution.

Between 1997 and 2006, he served as an editorial writer for the Washington Post specializing in legal affairs. Before joining the editorial-page staff of the Washington Post, Wittes covered the Justice Department and federal regulatory agencies as a reporter and news editor at Legal Times. His writing has also appeared in a wide range of journals and magazines, including the AtlanticSlate, the New Republic, the Wilson Quarterly, the Weekly StandardPolicy Review, and First Things.

Benjamin Wittes was born November 5, 1969, in Boston, Massachusetts, and graduated from Oberlin College in 1990. He has a black belt in tae kwon do.

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Blogs

Edward Snowden: Civil Liberties Violator

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Tuesday, July 8, 2014

A government contractor steals tens of thousands of highly-sensitive communications intercepts. The communications have national security implications, yes, but put that aside for now. They also involve the most intimate details of the lives of thousands of people: their love letters, their pictures of their kids, their pictures of themselves in lingerie, records reflecting their domestic and professional struggles.

US Flag
Blogs

The Al-Aulaqi OLC Memo: A Quick and Dirty Summary

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, June 23, 2014

I have this feeling that a lot of people are going to mischaracterize the just-released OLC memo on the Anwar Al-Aulaqi strike.

Law and Justice
Blogs

A Few Additional Thoughts on Daoud

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Tuesday, June 17, 2014

I largely agree with Steve Vladeck’s excellent post on Judge Richard Posner’s decision yesterday inDaoud and Judge Ilana Rovner’s concurrence in that decision

Privacy, Security, and the National Security Agency (NSA)
Blogs

Why Does the Omniscient Panopticon Tolerate Glenn Greenwald?

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, June 9, 2014

If you believe Glenn Greenwald’s new book (which I reviewed here), the NSA’s appetite for gobbling up communications is unlimited. Legal controls on its behavior are trivial. Its much-repeated claim that it does not spy on American citizens is a lie. 

Privacy, Security, and the National Security Agency (NSA)
Blogs

Thoughts on Edward Snowden’s Interview

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, May 29, 2014

Let’s give Edward Snowden his due: He did himself a lot of good in his interview with NBC’s Brian Williams, which aired last night. He presents well, coming across as earnest, thoughtful and intelligent.

Blogs

The Intelligence Legitimacy Paradox

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, May 15, 2014
Blogs

The New York Times on David Barron

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, May 8, 2014
Blogs

Is the NSA Story Coming to an End?

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, May 5, 2014
Blogs

MILOPS Thoughts on China’s Maritime Disputes

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Wednesday, April 30, 2014

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