Margaret (Macke) Raymond

Research Fellow
Biography: 

Margaret E. Raymond is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

At Hoover, Raymond serves as director of the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO), which analyzes education reform efforts around the country. CREDO’s mission is to improve the quantity and quality of evidence about the impacts of education innovations on student achievement in public K–12 education. Raymond, who has done extensive work in public policy and education reform, is currently researching the development of competitive markets and the creation of reliable data on program performance.

In partnership with the Walton Family Foundation and Pearson Learning Systems, Raymond is leading a national study of the effectiveness of public charter schools. The public-academic-private partnership helps public charter schools adopt information technologies as a means to both support their operations and generate information required by the study design. More than 250 public charter schools have joined the study to date.

Before joining Hoover in 2000, Raymond held faculty positions in the Departments of Political Science and Economics at the University of Rochester. Highly sought as a negotiator and mediator, Raymond was instrumental in restructuring public utility regulation in several states and testified in federal and state regulatory cases.

From 1985 to 2000, Raymond was president of Raymond Associates, a private consulting company specializing in public policy research projects and telecommunications policy formulation. She played an integral role in developing and analyzing programs for government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and corporations. Research areas included criminal and juvenile justice, welfare, social services, education, economic development, and telecommunications. The firm also provided business consulting to corporations, including strategic planning, process redesign, market analysis, and start-up services. Between 1988 and 1992, Raymond worked in the telecommunications industry, successfully creating coalitions among telecom executives and new market entrants to bring competition to local telephone services.

Raymond completed graduate degrees from the University of Rochester in public policy analysis (MS, 1980), community medicine (MS, 1982), and political science (MA, 1983). She earned a PhD in political science from the University of Rochester in 1985. Raymond was awarded her BA (summa cum laude) in psychology by Boston University in 1976.

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Recent Commentary

Featured Commentary

L.A. could learn a lot about charter schools from the Big Apple

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Los Angeles Times
Monday, February 1, 2010

Many charter school supporters believe their hour has come. . . .

School Buses
Featured Commentary

Letter: Charter Quality's the Issue, Not Research Methods

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Education Week
Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Your recent online Commentary by Jeanne Allen of the Center for Education Reform ("Charter Laws and Flawed Research," Sept. 8, 2009) perpetuates a misconception she has about the compositions of “virtual twins” that were used in a report by Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes, “Multiple Choice: Charter School Performance in 16 States.”...

High school students in class
Featured Commentary

It’s Time to Get Serious About Charter School Quality

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Education Week
Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Several years ago, I watched a colleague risk it all to open a restaurant...

Students raising their hands
Featured Commentary

Differentiated accountability

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Washington Times
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

While endless discussions of No Child Left Behind play out in Congress, the two presidential candidates clearly recognize the American public endorses the basic idea of holding schools accountable for performance...

teacher and student
Featured Commentary

How Well Are Teachers Doing?

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, December 1, 2003

What is needed is a way to separate the important contributions that teachers make from family, school, and other influences.

Center for Research on Education Outcomes

Learn more about Raymond and her work at CREDO from the CREDO website.