Niall Ferguson

Senior Fellow
Biography: 

Niall Ferguson, Hoover senior fellow, is the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University and a noted author.

Ferguson's books include The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective (2010), High Financier: The Lives and Time of Siegmund Warburg (2010), and The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World (Penguin, 2008). His first book, Paper and Iron: Hamburg Business and German Politics in the Era of Inflation 1897–1927 (Cambridge University Press, 1995), was short-listed for the History Today Book of the Year award; the collection of essays he edited, Virtual History: Alternatives and Counterfactuals (Macmillan, 1997), was a best seller in the United Kingdom.

In 1998 he published, to international critical acclaim, The Pity of War: Explaining World War One (Basic Books) and The World's Banker: The History of the House of Rothschild (Penguin). The latter won the Wadsworth Prize for Business History and was also short-listed for the Jewish Quarterly/Wingate Literary Award and the American National Jewish Book Award. In 2001 he published The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World, 1700–2000 (Basic), the product of a year as Houblon-Norman Fellow at the Bank of England.

His books have been translated and published in numerous countries, including the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Italy, Spain, South Korea, and Taiwan.

He is a regular contributor to television and radio. In 2003 he wrote and presented six-part history of the British Empire for Channel 4 n the United Kingdom. The accompanying book, Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power (Basic), was a best seller in both Britain and the United States. He also wrote and presented the two-hour film American Colossus, broadcast in the UK in 2004.

He has just completed a six-part history of the twentieth century, The War of the World, to be broadcast in the UK in 2006.

A prolific commentator on contemporary politics, he writes and reviews regularly for the British and American press. He and his family divide their time between the United States and the United Kingdom.

He is the recipient of the Benjamin Franklin Award for public service (2010).

Born in Glasgow in 1964, Niall Ferguson was awarded a Demyship (half-fellowship) for his academic achievements by Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1981 and graduated with First Class Honours in 1985. After two years as a Hanseatic Scholar in Hamburg and Berlin, he took up a research fellowship at Christ's College, Cambridge, in 1989, subsequently moving to a lectureship at Peterhouse. He taught for more than a decade at Jesus College, Oxford, and was then Herzog Professor of Economics at the Stern School of Business, New York University, before moving to Harvard in 2004.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die

The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die

by Niall Fergusonvia Fellow Talks
Monday, May 5, 2014

Niall Ferguson, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, discussed the falling quality of American institutions in his talk entitled “The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die.

Barack Obama
Featured Commentary

America's Global Retreat

by Niall Fergusonvia Wall Street Journal
Monday, February 24, 2014

Since former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke uttered the word "taper" in June 2013, emerging-market stocks and currencies have taken a beating.

Mexican Flag
Featured Commentary

Mexico's Economic Reform Breakout

by Niall Fergusonvia Wall Street Journal
Thursday, January 2, 2014

For much of the last decade, Mexico and Brazil were a study in contrasts. "Brazil Takes Off" was a typical magazine cover, depicting Rio's huge statue of Christ literally blasting off.

US-China Relations
Featured Commentary

The U.S. and China Both Need Economic Rehab

by Niall Ferguson, Moritz Schularickvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Nearly seven years have passed since we coined the word Chimerica in these pages to characterize the symbiotic relationship between China and America.

Declaration of Dependence

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 18, 2013

Tocqueville admired the independence of the Americans he met. Their descendants now swaddle themselves in a regulatory state.

The Lincoln Memorial is closed due to the federal government shutdown
Featured Commentary

The Shutdown Is a Sideshow. Debt Is the Threat

by Niall Fergusonvia Wall Street Journal
Friday, October 4, 2013

In the words of a veteran investor, watching the U.S. bond market today is like sitting in a packed theater and smelling smoke. You look around for signs of other nervous sniffers. But everyone else seems oblivious.

 

Featured Commentary

The End of The American Dream

by Niall Fergusonvia Daily Beast
Thursday, June 27, 2013
Featured Commentary

The Regulated States of America

by Niall Fergusonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, June 18, 2013

In "Democracy in America," published in 1833, Alexis de Tocqueville marveled at the way Americans preferred voluntary association to government regulation.

The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die

The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die

by Niall Fergusonvia Penguin Press
Thursday, June 13, 2013

What causes rich countries to lose their way?

Featured Commentary

The E.U.’s Feeble War on Unemployment

by Niall Fergusonvia New York Times
Monday, June 3, 2013

Pages