Morris P. Fiorina

Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Political and Social Science
National Academy of Sciences
Biography: 

Morris P. Fiorina is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. His current research focuses on elections and public opinion with particular attention to the quality of representation: how well the positions of elected officials reflect the preferences of the public.

During the course of his forty-year career Fiorina has published numerous articles and books on national politics including Congress—Keystone of the Washington Establishment (Yale University Press, 1977), Retrospective Voting in American National Elections (Yale University Press, 1981), and Divided Government (Allyn & Bacon, 1992). The Personal Vote: Constituency Service and Electoral Independence, coauthored with Bruce Cain and John Ferejohn (Harvard University Press, 1987), won the 1988 Richard F. Fenno Prize. He is also coeditor of Continuity and Change in House Elections (Stanford University Press and Hoover Press, 2000). The third edition of his 2004 groundbreaking book Culture War: The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel J. Abrams and Jeremy C. Pope) was published in 2011. Most recently he coedited Can We Talk? The Rise of Rude, Nasty, Stubborn Politics (Pearson, 2013).

Fiorina has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of more than a dozen journals on political science, law, political economy, and public policy. From 1986 to 1990 he was chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies.

Fiorina received his BA degree from Allegheny College and his MA and PhD from the University of Rochester. He lives in Portola Valley, California.

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Recent Commentary

David Brady and Morris Fiorina discuss The 2008 Elections: Setting the Scene

with David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, October 29, 2007

David Brady and Morris Fiorina discuss The 2008 Elections: Setting the Scene (44:41)

No Gain in Democratic Voter Registration since 1994

Purple Voters in the Golden State

by Morris P. Fiorina, Samuel J. Abramsvia Hoover Digest
Friday, October 19, 2007

California’s Republican Party has drifted off the centrist track. But its voters haven’t. By Morris P. Fiorina and Samuel J. Abrams.

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Polarization in America

with David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, June 4, 2007

The general public is often portrayed as bitterly divided on social, political, and economic issues, but new research shows that most Americans stand in the middle of the political landscape, preferring centrist candidates and holding moderate positions on charged cultural issues. It is the political parties and the media that have ignored this fact and distorted public perceptions.

Red and Blue Nation? Characteristics and Causes of America's Polarized Politics

with David Brady, Morris P. Fiorina, Pietro Nivolavia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, April 18, 2007

During the past decade, neither the Democrats nor the Republicans have been able to capture a majority of the vote in national elections. In fact, the country hasn't been so evenly divided since the 1870s. Some say this is evidence of a culture war and a political divide that has split the country into two Americas. Others disagree, arguing that in fact most Americans are in the moderate middle and are divided on relatively few issues. Who's right?

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The Center Holds

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2007

America is not the fatally polarized nation we often imagine it to be. On most issues, the majority of red-staters and blue-staters are on the same side. By Morris P. Fiorina.

Analysis and Commentary

Beyond Red and Blue

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Stanford Magazine
Friday, September 1, 2006

During the long decade between pundit Pat Buchanan’s declaration of war and novelist Jane Smiley’s cry of anguish, the notion that America had split into two bitterly opposed political camps became as commonplace as apple pie...

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What Culture Wars?

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 2004

Debunking the myth of a polarized America. By Morris P. Fiorina.

RED AND BLUE ALL OVER: The Political Divide in America

with Morris P. Fiorina, David Brooks, Daron Shawvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, May 3, 2004

During the past decade, neither the Democrats nor the Republicans have been able to capture a majority of the vote in national elections. In fact, the country hasn't been so evenly divided since the 1870s. Some say this is evidence of a culture war and a political divide that has split the country into two Americas. Others disagree, arguing that in fact most Americans are in the moderate middle and are divided on relatively few issues. Who's right?

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Beating the Odds

by David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

With the slow economy and a slew of corporate scandals making headlines, the Democrats should have swept last fall’s midterm elections. What happened? An analysis by Hoover fellows David W. Brady and Morris P. Fiorina.

Analysis and Commentary

The 2002 Elections: Much Sound, Little Fury

by David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, December 30, 2002

What the switch in control will change is the "show time" aspects of the Senate process.

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