Peter Thiel, President of Clarium Capital Management

Peter A. Thiel

Biography: 

Peter Thiel is president of Clarium Capital Management, one of the leading hedge funds in the nation. In 1998, he co-founded PayPal and served as its Chairman and CEO until the company was sold to eBay in 2002 for $1.5 billion. He also was an early investor in Facebook. He received a BA in philosophy and a JD from Stanford University.

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Peter Thiel on markets, technology, and education
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Peter Thiel on markets, technology, and education

interview with Peter A. Thielvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, October 24, 2014

In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, guest Peter Thiel, one of Silicon Valley’s leading investors and thinkers, discusses his new book Zero to One.

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Peter Thiel and Andy Kessler on the state of technology and innovation

with Peter A. Thiel, Andy Kesslervia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, September 19, 2013

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, host Peter Robinson mediates a discussion between PayPal founder and Stanford Professor Peter Thiel and Velocity Capital Management founder and journalist Andy Kessler on the state of technology and innovation in the United States over the past four decades. Thiel argues that, outside of computers, there has been very little innovation in the past forty years, and the rate of technological change has significantly decreased when compared to the first half of the 20th century. In contrast, Kessler asserts that innovation comes in waves, and we are on the verge of another burst of technological breakthroughs. Industries covered include education, medicine and biotechnology, as well as robots and high tech.

Peter Thiel, President of Clarium Capital Management

Government, Economic Growth, and Speculative Investing with Peter Thiel

by Peter M. Robinsonwith Peter A. Thielvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, December 1, 2008

In this Uncommon Knowledge interview from November 24, 2008, Thiel argues that a book published in France in 1968, Le Defi Americain (The American Challenge), has a lot to say to us in 2008, including why the United States has failed to rise to the heights predicted by its author, J. J. Servan-Schreiber. In explaining what’s wrong with the US economy, Thiel points out that, although we have benefited from growth that is both extensive (e.g., free trade) and intensive (e.g., technology), we have not featured enough of each. He asserts that the credit crisis of 2008 had nothing to do with the failings of the free market but rather is a by-product of government entanglement, nurtured by the motors of economic growth, working less well than expected. (38:56)

The Optimistic Thought Experiment

by Peter A. Thielvia Policy Review
Tuesday, January 29, 2008

In the long run, there are no good bets against globalization

WHAT, U.S. WORRY? Is the United States Losing Its Competitive Edge?

with Craig Barrett, Stephen Moore, Peter A. Thielvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 28, 2004

In the last decade and a half, India and China have both engaged in extensive economic reforms, in effect bringing their joint population of some 2.3 billion into the worldwide system of capitalism and free trade. Those 2.3 billion people, many of whom are extremely well educated, are by and large willing to work harder and for less pay than are Americans. Are India and China's expanding and modernizing economies threatening America's long global dominance of science, technology, and industry? If so, what should we do about it? Peter Robinson speaks with Craig Barrett, Stephen Moore, and Peter A. Thiel.

WIRING FOR DOLLARS: The Electronic Money Revolution

with Richard W. Rahn, Peter A. Thielvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, October 21, 1999

Guests predict that, in the near future, most people will no longer use cash, but rather conduct all financial transactions electronically. These transactions will be instantaneous, secure, and invisible and will remake the entire global economy. What will happen when governments can no longer control or tax the flow of capital? According to our guests, nothing less than a revolution.