Williamson M. Evers

Research Fellow
Research Team: 
Biography: 

Williamson M. Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, specializes in research on education policy especially as it pertains to curriculum, teaching, testing, accountability, and school finance from kindergarten through high school. Evers was head of the Trump Education Department transition team beginning in September 2016. He was the US assistant secretary of education for policy from 2007 to 2009. From July to December 2003, Evers served in Iraq as a senior adviser for education to Administrator L. Paul Bremer of the Coalition Provisional Authority.

Former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed Evers to the California State Academic Content Standards Commission in 2010. In 1996 Governor Pete Wilson appointed Evers to the earlier California State Commission for the Establishment of Academic Content and Performance Standards. He is the only individual to have served on both standards commissions, both of which proposed the subject matter that students should learn in each grade.

Evers was elected in November 2004 to the Santa Clara County Board of Education, on which he served until February 2007. He is the immediate past president of the board of directors of the East Palo Alto Charter School on which he served from 1997 until 2004.

Among his recent publications are:

He has written opinion columns that have appeared in Education Week, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, and Christian Science Monitor.

Evers received his BA (1972), MA (1978), and PhD (1987) degrees in political science from Stanford University.

His research papers are available at the Hoover Institution Archives.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Out of the Equation

by Williamson M. Eversvia City Journal
Monday, September 17, 2012
Soviet Union’s launch of the first Sputnik satellite in 1957 stamp

The Risks of a "Sputnik moment"

by Williamson M. Eversvia Hoover Digest
Monday, August 13, 2012

Do we really want the federal government to launch a national curriculum? By Williamson M. Evers.

Analysis and Commentary

Nationalizing education through national defense?

by Williamson M. Eversvia Freedom Politics
Thursday, March 22, 2012

This Council on Foreign Relations proposal sounds like a much more ambitious re-run of the federal foray into K-12 education after the launching of Sputnik back on Oct. 4, 1957...

In the News

The Road to a National Curriculum

by Robert Eitel, Kent Talbert, Williamson M. Eversvia Pioneer Institute
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

The Legal Aspects of the Common Core Standards, Race to the Top, and Conditional Waivers...

Analysis and Commentary

Evaluate teachers on how much students have learned

by Williamson M. Eversvia Freedom Politics
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

On Tuesday, Nov. 1, a group of parents and taxpayers sued the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) to make the district follow the law, by evaluating teachers based on how much their students have learned...

New law nationalizes science education standards

by Williamson M. Eversvia Advancing a Free Society
Friday, October 14, 2011

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law SB300, Oct.

Analysis and Commentary

New law nationalizes science education standards

by Williamson M. Eversvia Freedom Politics
Thursday, October 13, 2011

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law SB300, Oct. 8, which approves the forthcoming national science-curriculum standards and lays out the path for California to put them into effect in 2013...I see three problems with the policy contained in California’s new law...

Analysis and Commentary

Are NCLB Waivers Legal?

by Williamson M. Eversvia Education Next
Tuesday, October 11, 2011

In truth, the Executive is seeking to make law. Imposing such conditions has never been approved by Congress, and the federal waiver law does not permit it...

Obama should heed Tocqueville on schools

by Williamson M. Eversvia Advancing a Free Society
Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Alexis de Tocqueville is famous for his portrait of 19th-century America and his philosophic insights on why the American society has flourished -- and also where it might go wrong.  It is worth the time to r

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