Sunday, July 1, 2001

2001 No. 3

How to Get Better Teachers—and Treat Them Right

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Want better students? Find better teachers. Hoover fellow Chester E. Finn Jr. explains how we can lure America’s best and brightest back into the classroom.

Why Bigger Isn’t Better

by Richard Sousa, Hanna Skanderavia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

As our schools and school districts become ever larger, parents, teachers, and students are finding themselves increasingly removed from educational decision making. Hoover public affairs fellow Hanna Skandera and Hoover associate director Richard Sousa on a disturbing trend.

This Just In: Vouchers Work

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The early evidence on the effectiveness of school voucher programs is in. The verdict? Vouchers work. By Hoover fellow Paul E. Peterson.

How Choice Will Prevail

by Terry M. Moevia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The battle for school choice may last decades, but the advocates of choice will ultimately prevail. Here’s why. By Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe.

How to Cure Health Care

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The United States spends a mind-boggling percentage of its GDP on a health care system that virtually everyone agrees is a disaster. Is there any way out of this mess? There is—and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman has found it.

How to Turn the Lights Back On

by Thomas Gale Moorevia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The only real solution to California’s energy crisis? Let the market work. By Hoover fellow Thomas Gale Moore.

California Steamin’

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Contrary to the conventional wisdom, California’s energy problems are not the result of deregulation but of reregulation. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

What California Must Do

by Pete Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

What can Gray Davis, the current governor of California, do to end California’s energy crisis? Hoover fellow Pete Wilson, the former governor of California, has a few suggestions.

“Poor” Assumptions in the Tax Debate

by Clark S. Judgevia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Politicians often speak of the rich and poor as if they were oil and water, the rich always rich, the poor always poor, the two never mixing. Nonsense. By Clark S. Judge.

Tax Fairness Is in the Eye of the Beholder

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The debate over the recently enacted tax cut was full of overheated—and disingenuous—rhetoric about "tax cuts for the rich." Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. ignores the rhetoric to examine the facts.

Rethinking Antitrust

by Kevin M. Murphy, Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Nothing better exemplifies the need for a more rational antitrust policy than the federal government’s harassment of Microsoft. By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker and Kevin Murphy.

Why Our Courts Aren’t Broken

by F. Andrew Hanssenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The court rulings during last November’s presidential election debacle in Florida managed to convince conservatives and liberals that our courts are too partisan. But Hoover national fellow F. Andrew Hanssen argues that the courts responded to the debacle just as they should have.

Love and Economics

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Although a firm believer in the free market, Hoover fellow Jennifer Roback Morse argues that there is one place that a laissez-faire approach won’t work: the family.

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The Pseudoscience of Global Warming

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Environmentalists have convinced the public that global warming is looming. Yet the evidence is far from conclusive–and the proposed remedies are based on politics, not science. By Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz.

The Nasty Mood in Russia

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Why the Cold War is still with us. By Hoover fellow Robert Conquest.

The Next Threat

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Have the world’s rogue nations at last begun to behave in a civilized manner? Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen fears not.

The European Orchestra

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Will Europe never be Europe because it is too busy becoming Europe? Hoover fellow Timothy Garton Ash unscrambles the conundrum of the European Union.

Putin Shows His Colors

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The biggest threat to Russian democracy? Neither former Communists nor extreme nationalists–but the Kremlin itself. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

The Carrot or the Stick?

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, June 30, 2001

The downing of an American spy plane on the coast of China this past April managed to worsen the already tense relations between the United States and China. As it seeks to improve our relations with the most populous nation on earth, what can—and should—the Bush administration do? By Hoover fellow William Ratliff.

Can El Presidente Pull It Off?

by Stephen Habervia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

When Vicente Fox was elected president of Mexico a year ago, expectations ran high. Those expectations have turned out to be far more difficult to meet than either Fox or Mexican voters imagined. By Hoover fellow Stephen Haber.

The Contras Fight Again

by Timothy Charles Brownvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

With a critical presidential election approaching in Nicaragua, leftist bureaucrats are attempting to disenfranchise former Contras. By Hoover fellow Timothy C. Brown.

How to Get AIDS Drugs to Africa

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The AIDS epidemic in Africa has reached catastrophic levels, with 24 million Africans expected to die of the disease in this decade. Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker explains what the West can do.

Under the Skin: Shelby Steele on Race in America

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele speaks out on affirmative action, the education gap, and the breakdown of the African American family. An interview by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

The Day Reagan Was Shot

by Richard V. Allenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Previously undisclosed transcripts of deliberations in the White House Situation Room—by one who was there. Hoover fellow Richard V. Allen opens a window on history.

What Tocqueville Knew about Religion

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Although in many parts of the world religious beliefs have led to bloodshed, in the United States religion, as Tocqueville himself understood, actually plays a unifying role. By Hoover fellow Charles Hill.

The Idea of Progress: Once Again, with Feeling

by Charles Murrayvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

"We need once again to embrace the idea of progress—the idea that history has a direction, the idea that human action has been, and is, making the world a better place." By Charles Murray.

What Tocqueville Would Say Today

by Harvey C. Mansfield, Delba Winthropvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, June 30, 2001

The enduring lessons of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, "both the best book on democracy and the best book on America—two subjects that for Americans, at least, are inseparable." By Harvey Mansfield and Delba Winthrop.

The Grand Dam

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Elena S. Danielson on the construction of one of the engineering wonders of the modern age—the Hoover Dam.