Friday, July 1, 2005

2005 No. 3

Why We Must Stay

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Why the war in Iraq is not like the war in Vietnam—and why the present conflict must not be permitted to end the way the former conflict ended. By Victor Davis Hanson.

Cowboys and Indians

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Want the American troops out of Iraq now? Be careful what you wish for. By Niall Ferguson.

Bush Country

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

In the Arab world, there is something new and exhilarating in the air—a debate on the meaning of freedom. By Fouad Ajami.

Liberty First, Democracy Later

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

The best way to promote democracy abroad? By first promoting liberty. By Peter Berkowitz.

The Danger in “Fixing” the CIA

by Richard A. Posnervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Despite opinion to the contrary, our nation’s intelligence services are not broken, nor can they be “fixed” simply by reshuffling the CIA’s organizational chart. The true strengths—and limitations—of our country’s spy agencies. By Richard A. Posner.

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The Passive Revolution

by Jared A. Cohen, Abbas Milanivia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Hard-liners may have gained a near stranglehold over the political and judicial sectors in Iran, but there is one critical sector they do not control—the people. By Jared A. Cohen and Abbas Milani.

How Long?

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

When will the regime of Kim Jong Il finally collapse? By Charles Wolf Jr.

Rx for Medicare

via Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

If you think the Social Security system is in bad shape, take a look at Medicare. How to fix one of the worst problems facing the nation. By Thomas J. Healey and Robert Steel.

The Latest Autocrat

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

The best description of Vladimir Putin? “Stalin lite.” By Arnold Beichman.

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Chirac’s Last Stand?

by Patrick Chamorelvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

This past spring voters in France and the Netherlands rejected the new constitution for the European Union—and dealt a stinging rebuff to French president Jacques Chirac. Can Chirac recover? By Patrick Chamorel.

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The Nine Lives of Tony Blair

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Tony Blair’s political career has survived more upheavals than that of any politician since Bill Clinton. The question in Britain at the moment? How many of his nine lives Blair has left. By Gerald A. Dorfman.

The Democracy Problem

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

In Latin America these days, democracy isn’t working very well. Indeed, it almost never has. Why? By William Ratliff.

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The Left Turn

by Stephen Habervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Throughout Latin America during the last five years, leftist politicians have unseated conservative leaders. What accounts for this radical change? ¡Es la economía, estúpida! By Stephen Haber.

Diversity: The Impossible Dream?

by John H. Bunzelvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Creating diversity on America’s college campuses is a noble goal. Achieving diversity is another matter. By John H. Bunzel.

Flexibility Is Not What Is Needed

by John E. Chubbvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Three years after the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act, the Bush administration is being pressed by school administrators, teachers unions, and politicians to ease up on enforcement. With this many critics, NCLB must be doing something right. By John E. Chubb.

All Deliberate Speed?

by Clint Bolickvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

The Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954 was supposed to have improved educational opportunities for minorities. Yet in many ways the educational chasm between minority and non-minority schoolchildren is as great now as it was then. By Clint Bolick.

Ethnomathematics

by Diane Ravitchvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Political correctness hits the math classroom. By Diane Ravitch.

A Million-Dollar Affair

by William F. Buckley Jr.via Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

A tribute to Milton Friedman. By William F. Buckley Jr.

Free to Choose

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Half a century after he first proposed school vouchers, Milton Friedman, the “Father of School Choice,” is still on the case.

Rx for Medicare

by Thomas J. Healeyvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

If you think the Social Security system is in bad shape, take a look at Medicare. How to fix one of the worst problems facing the nation. By Thomas J. Healey and Robert Steel.

The Wrong War

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

A sensible approach to the drug problem. By David R. Henderson.

To New Orleans, a Few Words from California

by Pete Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

In the wake of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina, former California governor Pete Wilson offers advice and encouragement to the citizens of New Orleans.

Why We Lacked Resilience

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

How could one storm score a hit on every wallet in the country? By Henry I. Miller.

China’s Quiet Revolution

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Why China’s more flexible exchange rates may be a boon to the global economy. By John B. Taylor.

To Preserve and Protect

by Lee Edwardsvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

“If Ed Meese is not a good man,” Ronald Reagan once said, “there are no good men.” A profile of a good man. By Lee Edwards.

Fair Winds and Following Seas

by Scott Taitvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

The world has lost a truly great man. By Scott Tait.

Teacher and Hero

by Jeffrey C. Blissvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Remembering a hero for our time. By Jeff Bliss.

Who Could Have Asked for More?

by Peter J. Duignanvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

Sixty years after the end of World War II, Peter Duignan reflects on what arose from the ashes.

Is Anti-Semitism Generic?

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

What do Jews have in common with Armenians, Ibos, and Marwaris? An historically similar pattern of economic and social roles—and of persecution. By Thomas Sowell.

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Vinegar Joe and the Generalissimo

by Tai-Chun Kuo, Hsiao-ting Lin, Ramon H. Myersvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, July 30, 2005

During World War II, personal relations between Chiang Kai-shek, the Chinese Nationalist leader, and General Joseph Stilwell, America’s top military adviser to China, grew famously acrimonious. The strained relationship, some have argued, may have had dire consequences for the Nationalists, who lost the Chinese civil war to the Communists in 1949.

Newly opened documents in the Hoover Institution Archives of T. V. Soong, one of Chiang’s closest aides, shed new light on the matter. Chiang, the documents show, considered firing Stilwell as early as 1942—and had the blessing of top American officials to do so—but ultimately chose not to. Had Stilwell been replaced, might history have been different? Tai-Chun Kuo, Hsiao-Ting Lin, and Ramon H. Myers consider one of history’s most intriguing “what-ifs.”

SIDEBAR: A New Window on Modern Chinese History