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Hoover Digest 2000 No. 4

October 30, 2000

A Time for Leadership

Margaret Thatcher

"Let us be in no doubt: the world is still a dangerous place." Hoover honorary fellow Margaret Thatcher, one of the most important figures of the twentieth century, offers guidance for the twenty-first.

October 30, 2000

A New Front in the Culture War

Since the 1960s liberals have held America’s moral high ground. Now conservatives want to charge the hill. By Hoover fellow Shelby Steele.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

October 30, 2000

What Compassionate Conservatism Is—And Is Not

Exactly what is "compassionate conservatism"? Stephen Goldsmith, a domestic policy adviser to the George W. Bush campaign, offers a primer.

October 30, 2000

The Difference Between the Parties Continues to Grow

Not much difference between George W. Bush and Al Gore? Tell it to Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell, who argues that the candidates are seperated not by tiny differences but by a chasm.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

October 30, 2000

How the Bush Dynasty Almost Wasn’t

Early in the third evening of the 1980 Republican convention, George W. Bush’s father was scarcely on Ronald Reagan’s mind. By the end of the night, he was Reagan’s vice-presidential nominee. An account from the front lines of the Reagan revolution. By Hoover fellow Richard V. Allen.

October 30, 2000

Why the Press Irks the GOP

Resentment of the media remains as basic to the identity of Republicans as does resentment of the English to the identity of the Irish." Hoover fellow Peter Robinson explains.

October 30, 2000

Lessons Unlearned

Americans may pay lip service to the Constitution, but all too often they’re willing to sidestep the document in order to achieve short-sighted political agendas. Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell explores a dangerous trend.

October 30, 2000

Egads!

Has the left embraced the marketplace at long last? By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

October 30, 2000

When More Isn’t Better

When it comes to education, politicians and school boards seem to believe that what is wrong with the system can be fixed by doing more of it. By Carol B. Low.

October 30, 2000

Invasion of the Privacy Snatchers

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The Internet has made it possible for governments and corporations alike to amass an unprecedented amount of personal information on all of us. Hoover fellow Charles J. Sykes examines the preeminent issue of the Information Age—the end of privacy.

October 30, 2000

Microsoft’s Future—and Ours

The Justice Department’s attempt to break up Microsoft is not only misguided on economic grounds—it could actually put our national security at risk. By Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz.

October 30, 2000

First Do No Harm

The overzealous policies of the Food and Drug Administration have pushed the time and costs of drug development to stratospheric levels. It’s time for a sweeping reform. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller.

October 30, 2000

Commonsense Environmentalism

A brief manifesto. By Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson.

October 30, 2000

Sure, the North Pole Is Melting. So What?

Hysterical media reports notwithstanding, there is no sound scientific evidence that the globe is warming. By Hoover fellow S. Fred Singer.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

October 30, 2000

Andrei Sakharov and the Nuclear Danger

A decade after the death of Andrei Sakharov, his views remain both trenchant and relevant. By Hoover fellow Sidney D. Drell.

October 30, 2000

Where Do We Go From Here?

What the Clinton administration’s foreign policy got wrong—and what the next president can get right. By Hoover fellow John Lewis Gaddis.

October 30, 2000

Follow the Flag

The politics of entire peoples are expressed through small pieces of cloth hoisted at the ends of poles. Hoover fellow Charles Hill on the potent symbolism of national flags.

October 30, 2000

Why Britain Should Say No

There is not a single convincing argument why Britain should join the European Union—not one. But there are plenty of reasons why Britain shouldn't. By Hoover fellow Robert Conquest.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

October 30, 2000

United We Fall

Europe’s drive toward unification threatens just the opposite—disunity. By Hoover fellow Timothy Garton Ash.

October 30, 2000

The Putin Paradox

Russia’s new president may claim to represent democracy and economic liberalization, but his first months in office have given the West considerable cause for alarm. Hoover fellow Michael McFaul on actions that speak louder than words.
Sidebar: The On-the-Job Training of Vladimir Putin.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

October 30, 2000

The Lingering Dream of Empire

With little fanfare, Belarus has joined Russia in a new confederation. Russia is now lobbying other former Soviet states to do the same. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop on Vladimir Putin’s expansionist dreams.

October 30, 2000

What the Democratization of Mexico Means for All the World

The year 2000 has been a global waterloo for one-party regimes, with historic electoral victories for opposition parties in Mexico, Taiwan, and Senegal. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond on a promising trend.

October 30, 2000

Mutually Assured Destruction, South Asian Style

In an alarming display of bravado in May 1998, longtime adversaries India and Pakistan tested their first nuclear weapons. Two years later, tensions between the two states remain high. Hoover fellow Thomas W. Simons Jr. assesses the prospects for peace.

October 30, 2000

Flashpoint, Taiwan

The fate of Taiwan is one of the world’s most hotly disputed issues. Hoover fellows Linda Chao and Ramon H. Myers explain what China and Taiwan—and the United States—can do to ease tensions.

October 30, 2000

Cold War, Hot Debate

How Ted Turner lost the Cold War. By Hoover media fellow Helle Bering.

October 30, 2000

Remembering Joseph Brodsky

An appreciation of the exiled Russian poet and winner of the Nobel Prize for literature. By Cissie Dore Hill.

October 30, 2000

Jan Karski, Freedom Fighter

Jan Karski, a Polish underground leader during World War II, brought the first eyewitness accounts of the Holocaust to a mostly unbelieving West. A eulogy of the late hero by Hoover media fellow Deroy Murdock.

October 30, 2000

Jan Karski and the Hoover Institution

After serving as the eyes and ears of the Polish resistance in World War II, Jan Karski became the eyes and ears of the Hoover Institution, securing thousands of documents related to wartime underground movements and governments in exile.
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