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Hoover Digest 2002 No. 1

January 30, 2002

How to Win the War

The war on terrorism cannot be won by military means alone. Larry Diamond on what the United States must do to achieve a lasting victory.

January 30, 2002

To Fight a New “Ism”

What can the Cold War teach us about the war on terrorism? Plenty. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

January 30, 2002

Questions—and Answers

What motivates terrorists? Which regimes are most likely to spawn terrorist groups? How can the scourge of terrorism be stopped? By Hoover fellow Bruce Bueno de Mesquita.

January 30, 2002

The “Blowback” Myth : How Bad History Could Make Bad Policy

The dangers of learning the wrong lessons from history. By Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

January 30, 2002

War of the Worlds

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele reflects on September 11, the ultimate collision between the First and Third Worlds.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

January 30, 2002

Where Ignorance Isn’t Bliss

After the terrorist attacks, the level of American ignorance about the outside world became woefully obvious. Robert Conquest on the need for "more history and better history."

January 30, 2002

American Ingenuity: A Key to Future Security

It’s only natural for us to turn to our government leaders in a time of crisis. But do Americans expect the government to centralize even more of the workings of our society? That is hardly a foregone conclusion. By Hoover director John Raisian.

January 30, 2002

The Next Generation

A transformation has taken place on America’s campuses. By Hoover fellow John Lewis Gaddis.

January 30, 2002

Picking Up the Pieces

Even before the current war, Afghanistan had become a mass of rubble and mine-strewn fields in which fully half the prewar population had been killed, wounded, or forced into exile. What’s next for this war-ravaged land? By Larry Goodson.

January 30, 2002

Is Assassination an Option?

Is assassination a legitimate tool of American foreign policy? If so, under what circumstances? By Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz.

January 30, 2002

Security and Liberty

How to protect the nation against terrorism without sacrificing our liberty. By Ekaterina Drozdova and Michael Samoilov.

January 30, 2002

Justice in a Time of War

How much additional authority should the federal government be granted? By Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara.

January 30, 2002

What the Anthrax Attacks Should Teach Us

Until recently a largely hypothetical threat, bioterrorism has now become a harsh reality. Jonathan B. Tucker explains how the American health system must respond.

January 30, 2002

The New Normalcy

Learning how to live in a newly dangerous world. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller and Sherri Ferris.

January 30, 2002

The Return of the Bully Pulpit

In George W. Bush’s White House, might we actually have a president who means what he says? By Hoover fellow Bill Whalen.

January 30, 2002

War and the National Character

The terrorist attacks may have transformed the American character in ways the terrorists could never have anticipated. By Hoover fellow Charles Hill.

January 30, 2002

Up from the Ashes

When will the economy recover from the shock of September 11? Sooner than you might think. By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker and Kevin M. Murphy.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

January 30, 2002

Uncle Sam, Unfair Competitor

When it comes to engaging in predatory pricing and unfair competition, Microsoft has nothing on the U.S. government. By Hoover fellow Rick Geddes.

January 30, 2002

Now Is the Time to Teach Democracy

How can we defend our democratic way of life if we don’t even understand it? By Hoover fellow Diane Ravitch.

January 30, 2002

Vouchers and the Power of Choice

Setting aside the political arguments over school vouchers, Paul E. Peterson examines the early results of such programs—and finds much to praise.

January 30, 2002

The Counterrevolution

Although our federal courts are now less likely to engage in the irresponsible judicial activism of years past, basic individual rights are still under constant attack. It’s time for those who wish to defend these rights to learn how to fight back—if necessary, using the courts themselves. By Clint Bolick.

January 30, 2002

Time to Set Aside Set-Asides

Hoover fellow Robert Zelnick argues that it is high time to do away with race preferences. But will the Supreme Court ever agree?

January 30, 2002

The Myth of the Minority Majority

How race-conscious policies have failed. By Stephan Thernstrom.

January 30, 2002

A Holiday for Freedom

To commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, President George W. Bush this past autumn issued a proclamation naming November 9 "World Freedom Day." Where did the president get such a splendid idea? From Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman, who first proposed it in the Washington Times on November 9, 1991, two years after the historic events in Germany, and then advanced it tirelessly until the occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue heard him. Herewith an excerpt from Arnold Beichman’s original column, followed by the text of the proclamation issued by the president.

SIDEBAR: World Freedom Day Proclamation.

January 30, 2002

Europe at War

"We’re all under attack—all the free world." Europe responds to September 11. By Hoover fellow Timothy Garton Ash.

January 30, 2002

The Invincible Tony Blair?

Demonstrating steadfast support of the American war against terrorism, Britain’s Tony Blair has become one of the most popular politicians in the United States. Gerald A. Dorfman assesses Blair’s popularity back home.

January 30, 2002

America’s New Ally?

What the United States should—and should not—do to improve relations with Vladimir Putin’s Russia. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

January 30, 2002

The Forgotten War

The world’s attention may be fixed on the conflict in Afghanistan, but there is another bloody war under way in Central Asia. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop on the brutal confrontation in Chechnya.

January 30, 2002

The Ultimate Defense

In this excerpt from his recently published memoirs, Hoover fellow Edward Teller recounts his 40-year campaign for a strategic defense system that would, in the words of Ronald Reagan, make nuclear weapons "impotent and obsolete."

January 30, 2002

The Father of the H-Bomb Tells His Story

Hoover fellow S. Fred Singer on Edward Teller, "the most politically influential scientist of the 20th century."

January 30, 2002

Breaking Away

In this excerpt from her new memoir, An Old Wife’s Tale: My Seven Decades in Love and War,Hoover overseer Midge Decter describes her final break with liberalism.

January 30, 2002

What Is the “West”?

Jeffrey Hart on "the peculiar and powerful energy of the West."

January 30, 2002

Mediapolitik

With global media networks such as CNN broadcasting throughout much of the world, the media now possess an unprecedented amount of power and influence. An assessment by Hoover media fellow Lee Edwards.
SIDEBAR: The Media and September 11

January 30, 2002

W. Glenn Campbell (1924–2001)

W. Glenn Campbell served as director of the Hoover Institution, a position for which he was selected by President Herbert Hoover himself, from 1960 until his retirement in 1989. During those three decades Campbell transformed the Institution. He expanded its archives, made it a home for dozens of scholars of the first rank, and brought all its resources to bear on the struggle for individual liberty here at home and throughout the world. Campbell, who died of a heart attack on November 24, is survived by his wife of 55 years, Hoover fellow Rita Ricardo-Campbell, by his three daughters, by his four grandchildren—and by the fellows, employees, supporters, and friends of the Hoover Institution itself, who owe him an incalculable debt. Thomas Sowell reflects on the life of a scholar, a fighter, and a patriot.