Publications
Publications
policy review
hoover digest
china leadership monitor
education next
defining ideas

Hoover Digest 2002 No. 3

July 30, 2002

Hot Preemption

Hoover fellow George P. Shultz, a veteran of World War II and the Cold War, offers a strategy for fighting a new war.

July 30, 2002

The Liberty Doctrine

The United States tends to win its wars. Here’s how we’ll win this one. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

July 30, 2002

The New New World Order

If we can’t learn better ways of dealing with the outside world even after September 11, then the outside world will once again come to us. By Anne Applebaum.

July 30, 2002

Fighting the New War

We’re good at the conventional use of military force, but the next phase in the war on terrorism will require some unconventional uses. Is the Pentagon up to the task? By Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz.

July 30, 2002

Savage Wars of Peace

Much as we dislike doing so, when necessary we must send our military forces on peacekeeping missions and into regional conflicts. And in the war on terror, it will be necessary. By Max Boot.

July 30, 2002

John McCain, Call Your Office

Why McCain-Feingold won’t work. By Hoover fellow Tod Lindberg.

July 30, 2002

Simon Says

If Bill Simon wants to win the California governor’s race this November, he can start by reading this. By Hoover fellow Bill Whalen.

July 30, 2002

The Burden of Bad Ideas

Heather Mac Donald on the high price we pay for racial politics.

July 30, 2002

California and the Content of Our Character

An initiative on the California ballot this November dares to take race out of politics. Hoover fellow Shelby Steele explains a measure that could prove historic.

The content of this article is only available in the print edition.

July 30, 2002

The Challenge of Charter Schools

How to jump-start the charter school movement. By Hoover fellow Chester E. Finn Jr.

July 30, 2002

Mobility and the Achievement Gap

High rates of school mobility help explain the persistent gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students. By Hoover fellow Hanna Skandera and Hoover associate director Richard Sousa.

July 30, 2002

Where the Flat Tax Goes from Here

It’s alive and well overseas. Why not here? By Hoover fellow Alvin Rabushka.

July 30, 2002

Beyond Repair

The present tax system is beyond repair. It is impossibly complex, outrageously expensive, overly intrusive, economically destructive, and manifestly unfair. Hoover overseer W. Kurt Hauser offers a solution—junk it.

July 30, 2002

When It’s Not Just Humans Who Are in Trouble

Robert Mugabe, the autocratic president of Zimbabwe, has begun enacting misguided “land reform” policies that would confiscate virtually all of the private property in the country. The program is proving disastrous for the country’s people—and its wildlife. By Hoover fellow Terry L. Anderson.

July 30, 2002

The Biggest Pest

Gene-spliced crops not only increase yields, reduce the need for agricultural chemicals, and make better use of existing farmland but also are a potential boon to public health. Now if someone would just explain this to the EPA. By Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller.

July 30, 2002

Why We Said No

Hoover fellow David Davenport explains why the United States was right not to join the International Criminal Court.

July 30, 2002

The New Welfare Queens

Are transfers of wealth to Third World governments really an aid to economic development? Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell says no and explains why “foreign aid” is more often foreign hindrance.

July 30, 2002

The Continent Gets It

Its poor economic performance in the 1990s has led the European Union to take steps to open its markets. Are the Europeans finally starting to get it? By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

July 30, 2002

New Labour— and Old Unions

this is an image

Are Britain’s unions, pushed into the political wilderness during the Thatcher years, reemerging as a political force? In a word, no. By Hoover fellow Gerald A. Dorfman.

July 30, 2002

God Save the Queen

Why a thousand-year-old monarchy remains relevant today. A reflection on the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II by one of her subjects, John O’Sullivan.

July 30, 2006

The Wages of Complacency

Why Japan appears content with stagnation. By Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr.

July 30, 2002

An Uneasy Alliance

Relations between the United States and China have improved since September 11, but the two sides still view each other with a great deal of unease. Hoover fellow H. Lyman Miller on the most powerful nation on earth—and the most populous.

July 30, 2002

How to Push Putin

Relations between the United States and China have improved since September 11, but the two sides still view each other with a great deal of unease. Hoover fellow H. Lyman Miller on the most powerful nation on earth—and the most populous.

July 30, 2002

What’s So Great about America

Former U.N. ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick was right: “Americans need to face the truth about themselves, no matter how pleasant it is.” By Hoover fellow Dinesh D’Souza.

July 30, 2002

Eight Years That Shook the World

On the anniversary of two of his great speeches, an appreciation of Ronald Reagan, the “indispensable president.” By Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman.

July 30, 2002

To Benefit Mankind

Cissie Dore Hill on the evolution of the Nobel Peace Prize.
SIDEBAR: The Nobel and the Hoover Institution.