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Hoover Digest 2004 No. 4

October 30, 2004

Year Three

The good news? We’re winning. The bad news? We could still lose. By Victor Davis Hanson.

October 30, 2004

If the Dead Could Talk

They’d teach us about war. By Victor Davis Hanson.

October 30, 2004

Report from Baghdad

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Winning the war was easy. Winning the peace? Harder. Larry Diamond, who worked with the coalition in Baghdad last spring, explains what we have done wrong—and what we can still do right.

October 30, 2004

State of Siege

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Even as he gathers power into his own hands, Vladimir Putin is failing his nation. By Michael McFaul.

October 30, 2004

The Most Unpopular Man in Britain?

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Tony Blair is unpopular with the public and with his party. Why is he still in the job? By Gerald A. Dorfman.

October 30, 2004

After Fidel

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Once the island’s aging caudillo is finally gone, what will become of Cuba? An assessment by William Ratliff.

October 30, 2004

Kuwaiti Complexities

Is democracy possible in the Arab Middle East? Peter Berkowitz travels to Kuwait to find out.

October 30, 2004

A World without Power

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Tired of American global dominance? Just consider the alternatives. By Niall Ferguson.

October 30, 2004

What Culture Wars?

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Debunking the myth of a polarized America. By Morris P. Fiorina.

October 30, 2004

Congress: Still in the Balance?

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How Congress may look after the election. By David W. Brady and Jeremy C. Pope.

October 30, 2004

Door-to-Door with the GOP

When it comes to mobilizing supporters on election day, have the Republicans finally caught up to the Democrats? By Daron R. Shaw.

October 30, 2004

The Real Debt

The nation’s most serious debt problem? Not the “federal debt” but the country’s staggering future obligations to the Social Security and Medicare programs. Clark S. Judge proposes a solution.

October 30, 2004

Social Security’s Surprising Turn

Finally—some good news about Social Security. By Thomas J. Healey.

October 30, 2004

The Two-Hour Lie

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What does Michael Moore’s controversial film Fahrenheit 9/11 get right? Not much. By Russell A. Berman.

October 30, 2004

Privileged Sources

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As the courts seek to learn who leaked the name of a CIA agent to columnist Robert Novak, politics is trumping the law—and national security. By Robert Zelnick.

October 30, 2004

Good Odds in California

Expanding legalized gambling in California would create a huge jackpot for the state’s coffers. Governor Schwarzenegger, call your office. By Joseph D. McNamara.

October 30, 2004

Politics vs. Science

The case for federal funding of stem-cell research. By Elizabeth M. Whelan and Henry I. Miller.

October 30, 2004

Stem Cells: The Case for Bush’s Policy

The case against federal funding of stem-cell research. By Ramesh Ponnuru.

October 30, 2004

Power to the Patient

How to cure America’s beleaguered health-care system. By Scott W. Atlas.

October 30, 2004

Good Public Schools ... for the Rich

School choice is already available—unless you’re poor. By Clint Bolick.

October 30, 2004

Why Not Put Schools to the Test?

The best way to find out what’s wrong with America’s schools? Test them. By Bill Evers and Herbert J. Walberg.

October 30, 2004

Win-Win

Sure, Bill Gates is rich. But his employees aren’t doing so badly either, now, are they? By Richard A. Epstein.

October 30, 2004

The Cost of Care

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Republicans and Democrats in the Senate have been pushing to spend billions more on child care. But is more federal money the only—or best—solution? By Jeffrey M. Jones.

October 30, 2004

Affirmative Action around the World

Thomas Sowell recently concluded a study of affirmative action programs around the world, from India and Malaysia to Nigeria and the United States. His findings? Such programs have at best a negligible impact on the groups they are intended to assist.

October 30, 2004

The Economist

“As an expositor of economic principles and their application to the policies of our day, Thomas Sowell has no rival.” By Tom Bethell.

October 30, 2004

His Place in History

Reflections on the life—and legacy—of Ronald Reagan. By Martin Anderson.

October 30, 2004

Reaganomics

How Ronald Reagan’s presidency forever changed the way we think about the role of government. By Jeffrey A. Eisenach and James C. Miller III.

October 30, 2004

Roosevelt’s Failure at Yalta

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At an old tsarist resort almost 60 years ago, Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill met Joseph Stalin to determine the fate of post-war Europe. Roosevelt, argues Arnold Beichman, misread Stalin—and proved naive about communism itself.SIDEBAR: The Cold War Begins

October 30, 2004

Remembering the Warsaw Uprising

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Sixty years later, a look back at the longest and bloodiest urban insurgency of the Second World War. By Maciej Siekierski.SIDEBAR: History of a Friendship: Herbert Hoover and Poland
SIDEBAR: Hoover’s Polish Collection