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hoover digest

Hoover Digest 2011 No. 3

July 13, 2011

Like Striking a Match

The spark seemed so small. But the Arab autocrats had spent decades heaping up t
Image credit: Taylor Jones

The spark seemed so small. But the Arab autocrats had spent decades heaping up the fuel. By Fouad Ajami.

July 13, 2011

The Roots of a Freedom Agenda

The Arab struggles may be new, but American goals are not. Three recent presidents laid the groundwork. By Peter Berkowitz.

July 13, 2011

Lands of Little Rain

Merowe Dam in Sudan
Image credit: Xinhua/Zhang Ning

Drought may not be destiny, but a critical ingredient for democratic societies does seem literally to fall from the skies. By Stephen H. Haber and Victor Menaldo.

July 13, 2011

The Enemies of Our Enemy

We may not yet know what to do about the Islamists fighting in Libya, but we do know not to repeat certain mistakes. By Joseph Felter and Brian Fishman.

July 13, 2011

Tigers of a Different Stripe

Singapore is among the celebrated Asian “tiger” nations
Image credit: Licensed under Creative Commons

After their revolutionary fever cools, Arabs will have work to do. They could do worse than to emulate the booming Asian nations. By William Ratliff.

July 13, 2011

Trial of a Thousand Years

Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, left, arrives at Andrews Air Force Base in 1980
Image credit: USAF

Behind the headlines lies an old and basic question: in the clash between Islamism and the nation-state, who will win? By Charles Hill.

July 13, 2011

How Can Inequality Be Good?

If it prodded people to seek greater productivity, higher pay, and a better standard of living. By Gary S. Becker.

July 13, 2011

Why Business Isn't Getting 'In the Game'

Why businesspeople aren’t banking on Washington’s supposedly pro-business overtures. By Stephen H. Haber and F. Scott Kieff.

July 13, 2011

Doctored Numbers

Doctored Numbers
Image credit: Taylor Jones

The key justification for ObamaCare is “cost shifting”—that the insured pay a hidden tax to support the uninsured. But for the most part, such a shift does not, in fact, take place. By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

July 13, 2011

Tear Up That Lousy Contract

The economic crisis did at least one good thing: it forced us all to take a long, hard look at the enormous power of public-employee unions. By Robert J. Barro.

July 13, 2011

America’s Democratic Credentials

Hoover senior fellow Michael McFaul briefs President Obama in the Oval Office in
Image credit: White House/Pete Souza

Hoover fellow Michael McFaul, who has the president’s ear on Russia, argues that promoting freedom is both moral and wise.

July 13, 2011

Wishing Away the World

an image
Image credit: U.S. Navy/Mass Comm. Spec. 1st Class Gary Keen

Foreign policy doesn’t mean righting every wrong. It means acting in our national interest. By Bruce S. Thornton.

July 13, 2011

The Staggering Power of the Teachers' Unions

Teachers picket in La Habra last December
Image credit: © ZUMA/Newscom

A look at the most powerful force in American education—and it isn’t a force for good. By Terry M. Moe.

July 13, 2011

The States Are Back

The States Are Back
Image credit: Taylor Jones

Whether racing to the top or sinking in debt (or both), some governors are taking the school-reform baton back from Washington. By Chester E. Finn Jr.

July 13, 2011

Gone Fission

Unreasoning fear is the wrong reaction to the Japanese reactor crisis. We can master the risks and reap the benefits of nuclear power. By Richard A. Epstein.

July 13, 2011

Is Started with the Shah

A 1953 photo shows Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, the ruler of Iran

Hoover fellow Abbas Milani on the rebellions in the Muslim world—and the monarch who set them off. An interview with Charlie Rose.

July 13, 2011

Will Change Come to the House of Saud?

Reforms, if any, will depend on how modernizers and hard-liners settle their differences. By Daniel Pipes.

July 13, 2011

The Kingdom of Caution

The Kingdom of Caution
Image credit: Taylor Jones

The land where stability vies ceaselessly with stagnation. By Joshua Teitelbaum.

July 13, 2011

Extending an Invitation to Reform

Saudi King Abdullah, right, and then-president Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
Image credit: Agence France-Presse/Hassan Ammar

The United States has always been among the kingdom’s best friends. Who better to help it change? By Leif Eckholm.

July 13, 2011

Race and Economics

What do black Americans need in order to get ahead? A truly free market. By Walter E. Williams.

July 13, 2011

Robert Conquest's Five Books

Solzhenitsyn
Image credit: Taylor Jones

Hoover research fellow Robert Conquest was interviewed for the blog FiveBooks (www.fivebooks.com), whose mission is to “invite international experts to recommend the best reading in their given fields of interest.”

July 13, 2011

"A Radical, a Troublemaker..."

“A Radical, a Troublemaker . . .”
Image credit: Taylor Jones

As a scholar and a black American, Walter E. Williams has always been his own map. By Nick Gillespie.

July 13, 2011

The Core of Civic Virtue

Either we teach the young to understand and appreciate their freedom, or we cheat them of their birthright. By William Damon.

July 13, 2011

Honor in the Task

How can we shore up the American work ethic? By honoring good work. By Russell Muirhead.

July 13, 2011

Today's Liberation Technologies

A Cold War lesson that’s entirely relevant today: free people need free information. By A. Ross Johnson.

July 13, 2011

On the Road with Alexis

On the Road with Alexis
Image credit: Taylor Jones

New insights into Alexis de Tocqueville, the genius who journeyed into the heart of American exceptionalism. By Harvey C. Mansfield.

July 13, 2011

Tyranny 101

Tyranny 101 - Stalin
Image credit: Taylor Jones

Who better to coach a would-be dictator than Stalin? The curious episode of a foreign comrade who sought Stalin’s advice—which, of course, came at a cost. By Paul R. Gregory.

July 13, 2011

The Revolutionary Republic

Sun Yat-sen, at top center of this 1912 calendar

In 1911, China rejected feudalism to enter the modern era. A new Hoover exhibit on a century of change. By Hsiao-ting Lin and Lisa Nguyen.