Strategika

Strategika

Subscribe to receive Strategika. Subscribe »

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Issue 42

Europe: Death or Renewal
Background Essay
Background Essay

U.S. Foreign Policy and the Transatlantic Relationship

by Erik Jonesvia Strategika
Tuesday, June 20, 2017

As candidate, Donald Trump made a number of comments about the utility of the North Atlantic Alliance and about the virtues of European integration that left many in the establishment scratching their heads. When he was elected President of the United States, Trump did very little to soften his tone. On the contrary, the Trump White House floated the names of potential ambassadorial appointments who talked about the transatlantic relationship and the European Union in even more disparaging tones. 

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

State Of The European Union: God Bless The Bureaucrats

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Tuesday, June 20, 2017

In the immediate wake of the Brexit vote, a normally astute talk-show host declared, gleefully, that “the European Union is dead.” One begged, and begs still, to differ. The EU is a bureaucratic monster that interferes absurdly with “the structures of everyday life.” Its grand rhetoric masks expensive inefficiencies and military powerlessness: In global affairs, it’s a chatroom. On the economic side, its attempt to establish a common currency, the Euro, was folly, unleashing some economies but debilitating others.

Featured Commentary

Europe Is Still Ailing

by Bruce Thorntonvia Strategika
Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Recent elections in France, the Netherlands, and Austria, in which Eurosceptic populist and patriotic parties did poorly in national elections, suggest to some that the EU is still strong despite Britain’s vote to leave the union. Yet the problems bedeviling the EU ever since its beginnings in 1992 have not been solved. Nor are they likely to be with just some institutional tweaks and adjustments. “More Europe,” that is, greater centralization of power in Brussels at the expense of the national sovereignty of member states, is not the answer. 

E.g., 7 / 21 / 2017
E.g., 7 / 21 / 2017
Hoover Archives poster collection: UK 2756
Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Issue 10

Do drones present new military opportunities or are they simply an updated technological variant of age-old weapons and tactics?

Background Essay

by Thomas Donnelly Wednesday, January 1, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Kenneth Anderson, Benjamin Wittes Wednesday, January 1, 2014
article
by Mark Moyar Wednesday, January 1, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Frederick W. Kagan Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
by Benjamin Wittes Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
by Admiral Gary Roughead Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
Poster Collection, TU 28, Hoover Institution Archives
Sunday, December 1, 2013

Issue 09

Is our NATO ally Turkey emerging as a regional power that is hostile, neutral, or can remain a partner to American strategic concerns?

Background Essay

by Barry Strauss Sunday, December 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Walter Russell Mead Sunday, December 1, 2013
article
by Williamson Murray Sunday, December 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Edward N. Luttwak Monday, November 18, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Monday, November 18, 2013
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Monday, November 18, 2013
article
Hoover Archives Poster collection: FR 1145
Saturday, November 2, 2013

Issue 08

Is Russia now an enemy, neutral, irrelevant to U.S. strategic interests, or a possible partner with shared concerns?

Background Essay

by Edward N. Luttwak Friday, November 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Ralph Peters Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Kiron K. Skinner Friday, November 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, November 1, 2013
article
Poster Collection, UK 2798, Hoover Institution Archives.
Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Issue 07

Is there any chance that Europe, either in common or in terms of individual European nations–in particular Britain, France, or Germany–will recoup its military capability?

Background Essay

by Andrew Roberts Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Kori Schake Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Gil-li Vardi Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Bing West Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Ralph Peters Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Williamson Murray Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Pages

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Author

Section

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Background Essay

Legitimacy Rests In Iranian Hands

by Kori Schakevia Strategika
Monday, March 14, 2016

Whether Iran succeeds in gaining legitimacy with Europe and the United States after the end of sanctions by the West may have less to do with choices by the Western countries and more to do with internal Iranian politics. All of the parties to the Iranian nuclear deal want to provide that legitimacy; but Iran’s opaque internecine politics may get in the way.

Featured Commentary

Why ISIS Is Different—And Why It Matters

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Monday, February 1, 2016

The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) is the modern face of terror. Unlike al-Qaeda, the Irish Republican Army, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Maoists in India, the Shining Path, and other traditional terrorist organizations, ISIS refuses to lurk in the shadows. Unlike Hezbollah, Hamas, the Tamil Tigers, or the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, ISIS is not content with controlling a limited amount of territory confined to a single nation-state. 

Background Essay

Typologies Of Terrorism

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, February 1, 2016

The term “terrorism” is commonly understood as political violence outside the norms of conflicts between states. Terrorism’s victims can be innocent civilians, or they can be political officials or even soldiers. More controversial is the term “terrorist.” 

Featured Commentary

ISIS: The Latest Phase Of The Jihad

by Raymond Ibrahimvia Strategika
Monday, February 1, 2016

The best way to understand the Islamic State (ISIS) is to see it as the next phase of al-Qaeda. All Sunni Islamic jihadi groups—Boko Haram, ISIS, Taliban, al-Shabaab, al-Qaeda, even Hamas—share the same motivations based on a literal and orthodox reading of Islamic history and doctrine: resurrecting a caliphate (which existed in various forms from 632 to 1924) that implements and spreads the totality of sharia, or Islamic law.

Related Commentary

The Federal Republic of Germany: No Nukes, now or ever

by Josiah Bunting IIIvia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

In 1997, the writer spent several weeks at the Bundeswehr University in Munich, exploring a possible exchange of cadets with the Virginia Military Institute.

Featured Commentary

A Non-nuclear Germany: Today, Tomorrow, Forever

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

Those who used to worry endlessly about the “N + 1” problem—rampant proliferation—in the Sixties would be quite surprised some fifty years later. As the consensus of the strategic community had it at the time, there were some twenty countries with the industrial base capable of building nuclear weapons—and would do so in short order.

Featured Commentary

Nuclear Germany: Could The Impossible Become The Inevitable?

by Russell A. Bermanvia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

Drawing on the older traditions of the Prussian army, nineteenth-century Germany grew into a formidable military power, and during the twentieth century it nearly dominated Europe. It took two world wars to defeat Germany and to contain its aggressive ambitions.

Background Essay

No German Bomb—At Least For Now

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

This past September, the U.S. Air Force introduced a cache of 20 new B61-12 nuclear bombs to the Luftwaffe’s Büchel Air Base in western Germany. The upgrade, part of the NATO program on nuclear “sharing,” replaced a higher-yield version of the venerable B61 with a less destructive weapon, but it nonetheless sparked protest by opposition parties in Germany.

Nuclear bomb's tell-tale mushroom cloud
Related Commentary

Meet The Missile Challenge With The Anti-Missile Response

by Bruce Thorntonvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

Challenge and response has been the dynamic of warfare since the beginning of civilization.

Featured Commentary

It’s Mad To Forgo Missile Defense

by Frederick W. Kaganvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

American thinking about missile defense has been incoherent from the very beginning. The issue is superficially simple: the Soviet Union threatened the American people with nuclear missiles, so the U.S. should naturally have tried to defend them against those missiles.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Stay Up To Date!

Be notified when an new issue is available.

Subscriptions »

RSS Feed Subscription

subscribe and listen on iTunes

Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

To stay up to date when new issues are released, sign up here to be notified when a new Strategika is available.

Subscriptions »

 

The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.