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Monday, April 3, 2017

Issue 40

Trump's New Nationalism
Background Essay
Background Essay

America Alone

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Monday, April 3, 2017

Both in his campaign speeches and in his initial actions after taking office, Donald Trump has made it clear that he aims in his foreign policy to follow the path of dismantling America’s alliance system of turning away an economy that has emphasized globalization to one that is protected by tariffs, and of pursuing what he called one of “America first.” For many Americans, at least to those with some knowledge of the last 75 years, Trump’s direction appears to be a massive break with the past. It is not.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Precedents For The New Nationalism

by Kori Schakevia Strategika
Monday, April 3, 2017

Donald Trump has cultivated comparisons between himself and President Andrew Jackson by hanging the portrait of Jackson in the White House, making pilgrimage to Andrew Jackson’s grave, and pointedly emphasizing that he, like Jackson, “fought to defend forgotten men and women from the arrogant elite of his day.” It is a choice distressing to those who associate Jackson with illiberal policies of slavery, Indian removal, and refusing to enforce Supreme Court verdicts.

Featured Commentary

A Foreign Policy To Advance The Domestic Economy

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, April 3, 2017

President Donald Trump’s avowedly nationalist foreign policy agenda has been roundly criticized, both in the United States and abroad, for its narrow focus on America’s own interests. Some of the critics see as aberrant the very notion of putting American interests first, warning that it will promote “tribalism” and prevent cooperation among nations. In actuality, every U.S. administration has put America’s interests ahead of those of other nations, and every president at some point acknowledged as much in public, although not as often or as brashly as President Trump.

E.g., 4 / 25 / 2017
E.g., 4 / 25 / 2017
Hoover Archives Poster collection: FR 1145
Saturday, November 2, 2013

Issue 08

Is Russia now an enemy, neutral, irrelevant to U.S. strategic interests, or a possible partner with shared concerns?

Background Essay

by Edward N. Luttwak Friday, November 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Ralph Peters Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Kiron K. Skinner Friday, November 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Friday, November 1, 2013
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, November 1, 2013
article
Poster Collection, UK 2798, Hoover Institution Archives.
Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Issue 07

Is there any chance that Europe, either in common or in terms of individual European nations–in particular Britain, France, or Germany–will recoup its military capability?

Background Essay

by Andrew Roberts Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Bing West Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Ralph Peters Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Williamson Murray Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Kori Schake Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Gil-li Vardi Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
African Pictorial Collection, Box 2, Hoover Institution Archives.
Sunday, September 1, 2013

Issue 06

Will the Arab Spring offer any improvement, either domestically or internationally, over what it has replaced?

Background Essay

by Frederick W. Kagan Sunday, September 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Andrew Roberts Sunday, September 1, 2013
article
by Bing West Sunday, September 1, 2013
article
Hoover Archives Poster collection: CC 137, Celebration of the occupation of Sout
Thursday, August 1, 2013

Issue 05

What exactly are the strategic aims that North Korea hopes to achieve by the possession of a few deployable nuclear weapons?
by Walter Russell Mead Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Barry Strauss Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Thomas Donnelly Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Thursday, August 1, 2013
article

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Featured Commentary

A Non-nuclear Germany: Today, Tomorrow, Forever

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

Those who used to worry endlessly about the “N + 1” problem—rampant proliferation—in the Sixties would be quite surprised some fifty years later. As the consensus of the strategic community had it at the time, there were some twenty countries with the industrial base capable of building nuclear weapons—and would do so in short order.

Featured Commentary

Nuclear Germany: Could The Impossible Become The Inevitable?

by Russell A. Bermanvia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

Drawing on the older traditions of the Prussian army, nineteenth-century Germany grew into a formidable military power, and during the twentieth century it nearly dominated Europe. It took two world wars to defeat Germany and to contain its aggressive ambitions.

Background Essay

No German Bomb—At Least For Now

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Friday, December 4, 2015

This past September, the U.S. Air Force introduced a cache of 20 new B61-12 nuclear bombs to the Luftwaffe’s Büchel Air Base in western Germany. The upgrade, part of the NATO program on nuclear “sharing,” replaced a higher-yield version of the venerable B61 with a less destructive weapon, but it nonetheless sparked protest by opposition parties in Germany.

Nuclear bomb's tell-tale mushroom cloud
Related Commentary

Meet The Missile Challenge With The Anti-Missile Response

by Bruce Thorntonvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

Challenge and response has been the dynamic of warfare since the beginning of civilization.

Featured Commentary

It’s Mad To Forgo Missile Defense

by Frederick W. Kaganvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

American thinking about missile defense has been incoherent from the very beginning. The issue is superficially simple: the Soviet Union threatened the American people with nuclear missiles, so the U.S. should naturally have tried to defend them against those missiles.

Featured Commentary

The Pragmatics Of Missile Defense

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

Anti-ballistic missile (ABM) defense, as originally conceived in the 1950s and 1960s, was a Cold War era answer to the nightmare of Mutually Assured Destruction, the linchpin of Soviet and American deterrence.

Background Essay

Missile Defense: Past, Present, And Future

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

A new era of modern warfare began when German V-2 missiles hit London in September 1944. Within the next few years, the U.S. military was issuing reports on how to proceed in the development of defensive counters to ballistic missiles.

Strategika: “Arms Control, Ancient and Modern” With Barry Strauss

interview with Barry Strauss via Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Chronicling the history of efforts to restrain violence.

Strategika: “Why Arms Control Agreements Are Superfluous,” With Angelo Codevilla

interview with Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Why diplomacy can’t alter underlying realities.

Strategika: “Can The United States Restrain Iran?” With Walter Russell Mead

interview with Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Is the Iranian nuclear deal destined to fail?

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.