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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Issue 39

New Military Technologies
Background Essay
Background Essay

You Say You Want A Revolution?

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

To paraphrase the Beatles: Well, you know, you’d better free your mind instead; you may want a revolution but ought to settle for some evolution.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not Just The Technology: Beyond Offset Strategies

by Colonel Joseph (Joe) Felter (ret.)via Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

A range of breakthrough technologies are emerging today that have the potential to radically change how we fight and deter threats across all conflict domains—air, land, sea, space, and cyber. Artificial intelligence, directed energy, robotics, and machine learning are just a few examples. 

Featured Commentary

Moving Forward: The Need For Innovations In Technology And Strategy

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Two broad sets of U.S. military strategies during the second half of the twentieth century combined ideas, innovation, and technology in ways that offset Soviet conventional (and later nuclear) superiority in arms and military forces. These strategies also contributed to the overall state of cold war, as opposed to hot war, between the two superpowers. Today, the Pentagon is hard at work on a framework to achieve military dominance over a far more diverse set of adversaries. 

E.g., 3 / 27 / 2017
E.g., 3 / 27 / 2017
Poster Collection, UK 2798, Hoover Institution Archives.
Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Issue 07

Is there any chance that Europe, either in common or in terms of individual European nations–in particular Britain, France, or Germany–will recoup its military capability?

Background Essay

by Andrew Roberts Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Kori Schake Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Gil-li Vardi Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Bing West Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Ralph Peters Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Josef Joffe Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
by Williamson Murray Tuesday, October 1, 2013
article
African Pictorial Collection, Box 2, Hoover Institution Archives.
Sunday, September 1, 2013

Issue 06

Will the Arab Spring offer any improvement, either domestically or internationally, over what it has replaced?

Background Essay

by Frederick W. Kagan Sunday, September 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Bing West Sunday, September 1, 2013
article
by Andrew Roberts Sunday, September 1, 2013
article
Hoover Archives Poster collection: CC 137, Celebration of the occupation of Sout
Thursday, August 1, 2013

Issue 05

What exactly are the strategic aims that North Korea hopes to achieve by the possession of a few deployable nuclear weapons?
by Walter Russell Mead Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Barry Strauss Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Thomas Donnelly Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Thursday, August 1, 2013
article
Terence White Collection, OAC 2002C71. Hoover Institution Archives.
Monday, July 1, 2013

Issue 04

What do the Jihadists Want?

Background Essay

by Max Boot Monday, July 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Josef Joffe Monday, July 1, 2013
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Monday, July 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Monday, July 1, 2013
article
by Kiron K. Skinner Monday, July 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Monday, July 1, 2013
article

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Featured Commentary

It’s Mad To Forgo Missile Defense

by Frederick W. Kaganvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

American thinking about missile defense has been incoherent from the very beginning. The issue is superficially simple: the Soviet Union threatened the American people with nuclear missiles, so the U.S. should naturally have tried to defend them against those missiles.

Featured Commentary

The Pragmatics Of Missile Defense

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

Anti-ballistic missile (ABM) defense, as originally conceived in the 1950s and 1960s, was a Cold War era answer to the nightmare of Mutually Assured Destruction, the linchpin of Soviet and American deterrence.

Background Essay

Missile Defense: Past, Present, And Future

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Friday, October 30, 2015

A new era of modern warfare began when German V-2 missiles hit London in September 1944. Within the next few years, the U.S. military was issuing reports on how to proceed in the development of defensive counters to ballistic missiles.

Strategika: “Arms Control, Ancient and Modern” With Barry Strauss

interview with Barry Strauss via Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Chronicling the history of efforts to restrain violence.

Strategika: “Why Arms Control Agreements Are Superfluous,” With Angelo Codevilla

interview with Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Why diplomacy can’t alter underlying realities.

Strategika: “Can The United States Restrain Iran?” With Walter Russell Mead

interview with Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Is the Iranian nuclear deal destined to fail?

Featured Commentary

Lessons Of Past Arms Control Agreements For The Proposed Iran Deal

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

The history of arms control agreements is the history of violations. States sign agreements when they must, but break them when they wish. Secret violations are especially hard to monitor in dictatorships and closed societies.

Featured Commentary

The Checkered History Of Arms Control

by Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Arms control agreements have become an accepted part of the diplomat’s toolkit. They’re taught in seminars at places like Johns Hopkins’ SAIS and Harvard’s Kennedy School; they’re name-checked alongside peace treaties and trade agreements as things diplomats do; negotiating and monitoring them is even a career track.

Background Essay

The Flaws Of Arms Control

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

The U.S.-Iran “agreement” of 2015—its genesis, the negotiations that led to it, and its likely consequences—is comprehensible only in terms of a set of ideas peculiar to the post-WWI era, which distinguishes it from previous historical examples.

Poster Collection, US 06780, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “Cultural Decline and the Military” with Andrew Roberts

interview with Andrew Robertsvia Strategika
Friday, August 14, 2015

How political correctness is weakening the armed forces.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.