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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Issue 39

New Military Technologies
Background Essay
Background Essay

You Say You Want A Revolution?

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

To paraphrase the Beatles: Well, you know, you’d better free your mind instead; you may want a revolution but ought to settle for some evolution.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not Just The Technology: Beyond Offset Strategies

by Colonel Joseph (Joe) Felter (ret.)via Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

A range of breakthrough technologies are emerging today that have the potential to radically change how we fight and deter threats across all conflict domains—air, land, sea, space, and cyber. Artificial intelligence, directed energy, robotics, and machine learning are just a few examples. 

Featured Commentary

Moving Forward: The Need For Innovations In Technology And Strategy

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Two broad sets of U.S. military strategies during the second half of the twentieth century combined ideas, innovation, and technology in ways that offset Soviet conventional (and later nuclear) superiority in arms and military forces. These strategies also contributed to the overall state of cold war, as opposed to hot war, between the two superpowers. Today, the Pentagon is hard at work on a framework to achieve military dominance over a far more diverse set of adversaries. 

E.g., 3 / 27 / 2017
E.g., 3 / 27 / 2017
Hoover Archives Poster collection: US 2814
Saturday, June 1, 2013

Issue 03

Should Women serve in front line combat units?

Background Essay

by Kori Schake Saturday, June 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Josiah Bunting III Saturday, June 1, 2013
article
by Kiron K. Skinner Saturday, June 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Saturday, June 1, 2013
article
by Admiral Gary Roughead Saturday, June 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Saturday, June 1, 2013
article
Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection: IR 54
Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Issue 02

Can Iran be prevented from obtaining nuclear weapons by sanctions, or ultimately will it require preemptive military action? If Iran becomes nuclear, can it be contained?

Background Essay

by Edward N. Luttwak Wednesday, May 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Williamson Murray Wednesday, May 1, 2013
article
by Ralph Peters Wednesday, May 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Wednesday, May 1, 2013
article
Hoover Archives Poster collection: UK 3297, Britain's Land Offensive, Syria, The
Monday, April 1, 2013

Issue 01

Should the United States Intervene in the Syrian Civil War?

Background Essay

by Mark Moyar Monday, April 1, 2013
article

Featured Commentary

by Kimberly Kagan Monday, April 1, 2013
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Monday, April 1, 2013
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Monday, April 1, 2013
article
by Bing West Monday, April 1, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Monday, April 1, 2013
article
by Thomas Donnelly Monday, April 1, 2013
article
by Kiron K. Skinner Monday, April 1, 2013
article

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Poster Collection, US 06628, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “How the Military Has Resisted Political Correctness,” with Thomas Donnelly

interview with Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Friday, August 14, 2015

Why PC culture has failed to penetrate the armed services.

Related Commentary

Obama’s Intentionally Divisive Iran Nuclear Deal Rhetoric

by Max Bootvia Commentary
Monday, August 10, 2015

Last week Senator Chuck Schumer, the presumptive next leader of the Democrats in the Senate, announced that he was going to vote against the Iran nuclear deal.

Related Commentary

Conflicting Identities In the U.S. Armed Forces

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

My time on Navy active duty being long past, my insights into how the social changes imposed on the armed forces impact their capacity for combat flow from my acquaintance with former students who are now serving

Related Commentary

Mission Unclear

by Bing West via Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

It is manifest of our crazy times that the editorial board of Strategika has even posed this question (“Are there new dangers of the military bifurcating along ideological grounds, between traditionalists and those who wish to update military protocols to accommodate social and political agendas?”).

Related Commentary

Political Battles

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

Since the 1970s, the U.S. military has experienced intense conflicts between traditionalists and individuals intent on reshaping the military for ideological reasons.

Related Commentary

Reflections on the Military and Society

by Josiah Bunting IIIvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

The question, “Are there new dangers of the military bifurcating along ideological grounds, between traditionalists and those who wish to update military protocols to accommodate social and political agendas?” interests me because I have spent much of my life as a member of the military establishment—and also as a student, writer and biographer, professor and critic, of its members past and present.

Poster Collection, US 06628, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

The Real Danger Of Political Correctness

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

The corrosive effects of “political correctness” in modern American society are unlikely to divide “traditionalists” from “accommodationists” among the ranks, but they are all but certain to widen the gap between soldiers and statesmen.

Poster Collection, US 06780, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

Surgical Strike

by Andrew Robertsvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

A series of recent controversies have brought to the fore the central question of how much military protocols need to be updated, on both sides of the Atlantic, to accommodate social and political agendas.

Poster Collection, US 06031, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background Essay

Political Correctness And The American Military

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

One of the major worries that confronts those who study the American military at present is the question as to whether the accommodation of its units to the social and political agendas of a portion of America’s elite might not in the long run damage what has been for the past thirty years the most competent combat organization in the world.

Related Commentary

Appeasing Iran Ignores the Lessons of History

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, July 23, 2015

The now-concluded Iran nuclear negotiations predictably reflect ancient truths of appeasement.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.