K-12 Education Task Force

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American Teachers: As Mediocre As American Students?

mentioning Eric Hanushekvia Fortune
Friday, December 12, 2014

It’s common knowledge that American students are mediocre when it comes to taking tests. Now we know that American teachers are too.

Featured Commentary

Contentions The NEA’s Racial Profiling Curriculum

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Commentary
Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Given the volatility and sensitivity of “racial profiling” these days, heightened by recent developments in Ferguson, New York, and Cleveland and by brand new law-enforcement “guidelines” from the Justice Department, one could be tempted to thank the National Education Association for its recent effort, in league with a bunch of other organizations, to develop curricular materials by which schools and teachers can instruct their students on this issue.

Featured Commentary

Punishing Achievement In Our Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via National Review Online
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

President Obama’s contempt for the Constitution, and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s unfortunate disregard of that document, have been loudly and justly decried by critics of executive overreach.

Other Media

Jeb Bush Visits Washington To Talk About Education And Economic Opportunity

quoting Chester E. Finn Jr.via The State
Thursday, November 20, 2014

WASHINGTON — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush in a speech on Thursday argued that it’s getting harder to make a living and rise above poverty in America, and that a fundamental reason is that too many students don’t have access to a good education.

Blogs

A Five-Point Plan To Resuscitate Catholic Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, November 19, 2014

On November 11th, the Fordham Institute’s Chester E. Finn, Jr. addressed a private meeting of reform-minded Catholic education leaders and philanthropists. What follows is adapted from his remarks on that occasion.

Blogs

Do Teachers Support the Vergara Decision?

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, November 18, 2014

In June, a California court ruled, in Vergara v. State of California, that the state’s tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Featured Commentary

It May Be Harder To Become A Transformational Leader Than To Get Into Harvard

by John E. Chubbvia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Friday, November 14, 2014

Traditional principal preparation programs are notoriously non-selective. The new breed of program takes selectivity to the opposite extreme. Some have ratios of acceptances to inquiries or applications that rival competitive colleges—below 10 percent.

Other Media

Closing The Racial Achievement Gap Could Expand America's Economy By Trillions

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Huffington Post
Wednesday, November 12, 2014

The gap in educational achievement between white students and students of color could be costing the nation trillions of dollars, according to a new report.

Other Media

Getting More Poor Kids into College Won’t Fix Income Inequality

quoting Caroline M. Hoxbyvia Washington Post
Thursday, October 23, 2014

If you want to address income inequality, fix higher education. That seems to be the current thinking in Washington, where President Obama has urged college administrators to better serve low-income students.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured Commentary

The State of Education Reform

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Defining Ideas
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Though amazing progress has been over the past three decades, we need to do more. 

Pages

Eric A. Hanushek

Hanushek coauthors study concerning individual principals’ contributions to growth in student achievement

Friday, October 26, 2012

Although it is widely believed that good school principals have a positive impact on student achievement, little systematic research has been done to date on the effect of strong school leadership. Now a new study finds that highly effective principals raise the achievement of a typical student in their schools by between 0.05 and 0.21 standard deviations, the equivalent of between two and seven months of additional learning each school year. Click here to read why and how “School Leaders Matter.”

News
The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could by Hoove

In The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could, Education Expert John Chubb Proposes Raising Student Achievement by Raising Teacher Quality

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Stanford

Hoover Institution Press released The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could in which author John E. Chubb outlines a three-pronged strategy for raising teacher quality that is very different from the approach this country has historically followed. Chubb argues that, to develop the highest-achieving students in the world, the United States must attract, develop, and retain substantially stronger teachers, particularly if it wants to equal or surpass the achievement of top-performing nations in the world. The best achievement in the world requires the best teachers in the world—which US education policy has not been delivering.

Press Releases
Chicago Teachers’ Union  members march through Chicago during their 2012 strike.

Moe talks about the future of teachers’ unions

Friday, October 12, 2012

Terry Moe, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution's Koret Task Force on K–12 education, debates with Joe Williams, executive director of Democrats for Education Reform, on the future of American teacher unions in “After Chicago: the Future of Teacher Unions.” This event will be moderated by Michael Petrilli, research fellow at the Hoover Institution and executive vice president at the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation.

News
The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could by Hoove

Hoover Press to release John Chubb’s book on how to get the best teachers

Thursday, September 27, 2012

John Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and interim CEO of Education Sector, has written The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could, which will be released on October 10, 2012. In the book, Chubb argues that student achievement in the United States could rise to levels comparable to the best nations in the world if we could improve teacher quality.

News
Exam Schools: Inside America's Most Selective Public High Schools

Kirkus reviews Hoover fellow Chester E. Finn and Jessica Hockett’s upcoming book Exam Schools

Monday, September 17, 2012

Chester E. Finn Jr., a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and chairman of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and coauthor Jessica A. Hockett, an education consultant specializing in differentiated instruction, curriculum design, and lesson study, collaborated to produce Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools, which is due out in October 2012. In the book the authors examine how academically selective public high schools work and what is their important role in teaching the country’s brightest students. Exam Schools is a Koret Task Force on K–12 Education study.

News
Exam Schools: Inside America's Most Selective Public High Schools

Webcast examines options for high-performing students

Monday, August 20, 2012

The plight of low-performing students dominates our education news and policy discussions. Yet America’s high flyers also demand innovative, rigorous schooling, particularly if the country is to sharpen its economic and scientific edge.

On August 24 at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute in Washington, DC, Hoover Institution senior fellow Chester Finn and Jessica Hockett discussed how motivated, high-ability youngsters can be served in myriad ways by public education, including schools that specialize in them. This is the focus of their new book from Princeton University Press, Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools. In the book, the coauthors identify 165 such high schools across the United States.

News
John E. Chubb

Education Reform for the Digital Era

Monday, April 16, 2012

On Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. EST, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute is hosting a live panel discussion that will preview the upcoming release of its Education Reform for the Digital Era volume. John Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, will be a featured speaker.

News
John E. Chubb

Chubb appointed interim CEO at Education Sector

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

John E. Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, has been appointed interim chief executive officer at Education Sector, effective April 10, 2011. Chubb, a former board member, will replace Richard Lee Colvin, a noted journalist and editor, who is leaving his position to pursue new professional opportunities to write and reflect.

News
Paul T. Hill, Hoover distinguished visiting fellow

Hill steps down as director of Center on Reinventing Public Education

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Paul Hill, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and founder of the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE), stepped down today, March 1, 2012, as CRPE’s director. He named his longtime colleague Robin Lake as his successor.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Evers featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week”

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

“There is no constitutional or statutory basis for national standards, national assessments, or national curricula. The two testing consortia funded by the US Department of Education have already expanded their activities well beyond the limits of the law.”

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, was featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week” in the Heritage Foundation’s weekly digest, Education Notebook. The digest highlights developments in education policy.

News

Pages

The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.