K-12 Education Task Force

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Other Media

Gov. Jindal’s Common Core Lawsuit Draws on Pioneer’s Research

mentioning Williamson M. Eversvia Pioneer Institute
Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The legal complaint issued by Governor Jindal’s office clearly builds off Pioneer Institute’s white paper “The Road to a National Curriculum,” co-authored by former U.S. Department of Education General Counsel Kent Talbert, Deputy General Counsel Robert Eitel, as well as Bill Evers of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

Blogs

Comparing PDK and Education Next Polls

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Thursday, August 21, 2014

Just released this week are two major education polls, one by Education Next (EdNext), a journal of opinion and research, and the other by Phi Delta Kappan (PDK), a journal that serves the alumnae of schools of education. Both survey nationally representative samples of the U. S. adult population. EdNext polls about 5,000 respondents, including a nationally representative sample of teachers, by means of an online survey administered by Knowledge Networks. PDK poses questions to about 1,000 respondents in a poll administered by Gallup.

Blogs

Comparing PDK and Education Next Polls

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Just released this week are two major education polls, one by Education Next (Ednext), a journal of opinion and research, and the other by Phi Delta Kappan (PDK), a journal that serves the alumnae of schools of education. Both survey nationally representative samples of the U. S. adult population. Ednext polls about 5,000 respondents, including a nationally representative sample of teachers, by means of an online survey administered by Knowledge Networks. PDK poses questions to about 1,000 respondents in a poll administered by Gallup.

Other Media

A Bad Week For Common Core

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia Politico
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

This has not been a great week for the Common Core. Two new national polls, released Wednesday and Tuesday, found the public souring on the academic standards, which are meant to elevate math, reading and writing instruction across the nation. One of the polls, conducted by the journal Education Next, also found a steep plunge in support for the standards among public school teachers.

Other Media

Poll: Common Core Support Among Teachers Plummets, With Fewer Than Half Supporting It

quoting Paul E. Petersonvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Anybody watching the escalating battle across the country over the Common Core State Standards and aligned standardized testing will hardly be surprised by a new national poll which reveals a significant loss of support over the last year — especially among teachers, whose approval rating dropped from 76 percent  in 2013 to only  46 percent in 2014. Overall support for the Core dropped from 65 percent last year to 53 percent in 2014, with most of the defection among Republicans.

Other Media

Conservative Study Finds Falling Support for 'Common Core'

featuring Paul E. Petersonvia The Hill
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Public support for Common Core, the Obama administration’s program for setting education standards, has dwindled over the last year, according to a new study from a conservative group. The survey from Education Next, a journal published by the conservative Hoover Institution, found that 53 percent of people still favor Common Core, but the program’s support has declined sharply from 65 percent in 2013.

Blogs

Political Polarization Needlessly Divides the Public on Common Core and NCLB

by Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Political polarization is making it increasingly difficult to sustain support for policy undertakings that a majority of the public supports. Narrow interest groups and small minorities are twisting public opinion through slogans and rhetoric to which sensation-mongering elements in the media are giving excessive attention. Such is my conclusion after reviewing eight years of Education Next (Ednext) polling on No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Featured Commentary

The Public Turns Against Teacher Tenure

by Paul E. Petersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

It's back-to-school season, but teacher tenure has been a hot topic since summer began. In June a California court ruled that the state's tenure and seniority laws are unconstitutional in Vergara v. State of California. Minority students have filed a similar case in New York, with more to come elsewhere.

Blogs

The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Education Next
Friday, August 15, 2014

Why do American public schools spend more of their operating budgets on non-teachers than almost every other country in the world, including nations that are as prosperous and humane as ours? We can’t be certain.

Other Media

Does It Even Matter if Americans Are Terrible At Math?

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Vox
Wednesday, August 13, 2014

If there's one thing Americans know about international tests, it's this: we aren't very good at them. In 2012, the last time 15-year-olds from 65 countries and economies took an international math test, the US ended up ranked far from the top — particularly in math, where they were 27th of 34 countries. (The rankings aren't an exact science; the US could be ranked anywhere between 23rd and 29th, according to the Organization for Economic and Community Development.)

Pages

The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could by Hoove

In The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could, Education Expert John Chubb Proposes Raising Student Achievement by Raising Teacher Quality

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Stanford

Hoover Institution Press released The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could in which author John E. Chubb outlines a three-pronged strategy for raising teacher quality that is very different from the approach this country has historically followed. Chubb argues that, to develop the highest-achieving students in the world, the United States must attract, develop, and retain substantially stronger teachers, particularly if it wants to equal or surpass the achievement of top-performing nations in the world. The best achievement in the world requires the best teachers in the world—which US education policy has not been delivering.

Press Releases
Chicago Teachers’ Union  members march through Chicago during their 2012 strike.

Moe talks about the future of teachers’ unions

Friday, October 12, 2012

Terry Moe, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Institution's Koret Task Force on K–12 education, debates with Joe Williams, executive director of Democrats for Education Reform, on the future of American teacher unions in “After Chicago: the Future of Teacher Unions.” This event will be moderated by Michael Petrilli, research fellow at the Hoover Institution and executive vice president at the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation.

News
The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could by Hoove

Hoover Press to release John Chubb’s book on how to get the best teachers

Thursday, September 27, 2012

John Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and interim CEO of Education Sector, has written The Best Teachers in the World: Why We Don’t Have Them and How We Could, which will be released on October 10, 2012. In the book, Chubb argues that student achievement in the United States could rise to levels comparable to the best nations in the world if we could improve teacher quality.

News
Exam Schools: Inside America's Most Selective Public High Schools

Kirkus reviews Hoover fellow Chester E. Finn and Jessica Hockett’s upcoming book Exam Schools

Monday, September 17, 2012

Chester E. Finn Jr., a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and chairman of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and coauthor Jessica A. Hockett, an education consultant specializing in differentiated instruction, curriculum design, and lesson study, collaborated to produce Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools, which is due out in October 2012. In the book the authors examine how academically selective public high schools work and what is their important role in teaching the country’s brightest students. Exam Schools is a Koret Task Force on K–12 Education study.

News
Exam Schools: Inside America's Most Selective Public High Schools

Webcast examines options for high-performing students

Monday, August 20, 2012

The plight of low-performing students dominates our education news and policy discussions. Yet America’s high flyers also demand innovative, rigorous schooling, particularly if the country is to sharpen its economic and scientific edge.

On August 24 at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute in Washington, DC, Hoover Institution senior fellow Chester Finn and Jessica Hockett discussed how motivated, high-ability youngsters can be served in myriad ways by public education, including schools that specialize in them. This is the focus of their new book from Princeton University Press, Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools. In the book, the coauthors identify 165 such high schools across the United States.

News
John E. Chubb

Education Reform for the Digital Era

Monday, April 16, 2012

On Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. EST, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute is hosting a live panel discussion that will preview the upcoming release of its Education Reform for the Digital Era volume. John Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, will be a featured speaker.

News
John E. Chubb

Chubb appointed interim CEO at Education Sector

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

John E. Chubb, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of Hoover’s Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, has been appointed interim chief executive officer at Education Sector, effective April 10, 2011. Chubb, a former board member, will replace Richard Lee Colvin, a noted journalist and editor, who is leaving his position to pursue new professional opportunities to write and reflect.

News
Paul T. Hill, Hoover distinguished visiting fellow

Hill steps down as director of Center on Reinventing Public Education

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Paul Hill, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, and founder of the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE), stepped down today, March 1, 2012, as CRPE’s director. He named his longtime colleague Robin Lake as his successor.

News
Williamson M. Evers

Evers featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week”

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

“There is no constitutional or statutory basis for national standards, national assessments, or national curricula. The two testing consortia funded by the US Department of Education have already expanded their activities well beyond the limits of the law.”

Bill Evers, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education, was featured as the author of the “Quote of the Week” in the Heritage Foundation’s weekly digest, Education Notebook. The digest highlights developments in education policy.

News
Choice and Federalism: Defining the Federal Role in Education

Reboot Federal Role in K–12 Education, Hoover Task Force Says

Monday, February 6, 2012
Stanford

With the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act overdue for reauthorization, the Hoover Institution’s Koret Task Force on K-12 Education recommends a new and powerful strategy for fundamental education reform—and a major makeover of the customary federal role: allow states receiving federal funding to opt out of traditional federal constraints if they create vibrant marketplaces for informed school choice.

Press Releases

Pages

The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency; that include systematic reform options such as vouchers, charter schools, and testing; and that weigh equity concerns against outcome objectives.

Its collaborative efforts spawned a quarterly journal titled Education Next, one of the premier publications on public education research policy in the nation.

Chester E. Finn, Jr. serves as chair of the Task Force on K–12 education.