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Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Thoughts on Unconventional Threats and Terrorism

by Ambassador Karl W. Eikenberryvia Analysis
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The term “unconventional threat” has often been an imprecise classification tool and has led to a focus on tactics at the expense of strategy in the U.S. struggle against transnational terrorists groups like Al Qaeda.  Combating transnational terrorism requires properly evaluating the threat terrorism poses, a deep understanding of geopolitical context surrounding a transnational terrorist group, and a willingness to be flexible in the tools used to mitigate risk, including focusing on improving countermeasures in the homeland. 

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

KTO KOVO?

by Coit Blackervia Analysis
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Russia’s aggressive actions in the Ukraine are intended to signal to the West that there are limits to what Russia will accept in what it sees as aggressive Western action against Russia, even if Russia’s intervention comes at the cost of a split Ukraine. Ukraine will likely remain a frozen conflict, with the real issue being “for how long, and what cost, Putin will seek to impose his vision of the new Russia on the neighboring states of the region”.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Dealing with China

by Francis Fukuyamavia Analysis
Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Francis Fukuyama argues that, while neither the Chinese economic nor political models are sustainable in the long run, “We need to assume that China will remain on its current growth trajectory” and “cannot assume a deus ex machina solution to our present problem.” The first step, he says, entails building a multilateral framework for dealing with China's territorial claims.

Speaking the Law: Chapter 5

by Kenneth Anderson, Benjamin Wittesvia Analysis
Tuesday, September 23, 2014

In chapter 5, the authors look at the criticisms of the Obama administration’s legal policies on counterterrorism from both the political Right and the political Left—and explain why they largely reject both. They assert that although the framework of law and legitimacy that the administration has laid out is not without its problems, the legal, ethical, and policy framework is far more robust, as a matter of law, morality, and legitimacy, than the critics acknowledge. Moreover, in the view of the authors, it compares favorably with all the alternatives the various strains of critics have proposed in its stead.

Speaking the Law: Chapter 4

by Kenneth Anderson, Benjamin Wittesvia Analysis
Tuesday, September 23, 2014

In chapter 4, the authors discuss the Obama administration’s speeches in response to the NSA revelations made public by Edward Snowden and review the involvement of other branches of government in the legal framework described in the administration’s national security speeches. They explore the degree to which each branch is implicated in major aspects of the administration’s position. They also look at the degree to which the international system and its actors—other countries and international nongovernmental organizations—have had their voices heard, even though outsiders to the government, and have exerted leverage to influence it.

The State Clean Energy Cookbook

The State Clean Energy Cookbook: A Dozen Recipes for State Action on Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

by George P. Shultz, Jeremy Carl, David Fedorvia Analysis
Thursday, September 11, 2014

States are increasingly becoming the locus of domestic energy policy-making. Hoover's Energy Policy Task Force collaborated with former US Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee chair Jeff Bingaman and Stanford's Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance to find "what works?. The result is a dozen "recipes" for affordable, clean, and secure energy policies that have already been implemented in a variety of U.S. states with good overall results.

In the News

The Ukraine Crisis: An International Law Perspective

by Thomas D. Grantvia Chatham House
Friday, July 11, 2014

This is a summary of an event organized jointly by the International Law Programme and the Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House to analyse the international law issues that have arisen throughout the current Ukraine crisis. This summary outlines the main strands of discussion and analysis from the meeting.

Green Energy

For California's AB 32: Cap-and-Trade-and-Cash Back, Not Cap-and-Trade-and-Tax

by Jeremy Carl, David Fedorvia Analysis
Friday, February 7, 2014

The desire to protect the environment is a hallmark of the state and extends across the political spectrum. And given the environmental risk posed by global climate change, efforts to reduce the state’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and act as a model for jurisdictions elsewhere have now become a major part of California’s energy policy agenda.

More Simplicity, Less Charisma: Improving the Effectiveness, Cost, and Fairness of California's Climate Agenda

by Jeremy Carl, David Fedorvia Analysis
Tuesday, February 4, 2014

California needs to embrace the right regulatory tools for the right environmental problems if it is to accomplish its stated goals to both cost effectively reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and act as a policy model for others.

Revenue-Neutral Carbon Taxes in the Real World: Insights from British Columbia and Australia

by Jeremy Carl, David Fedorvia Analysis
Friday, December 21, 2012

While the scientific and economic implications of climate change remain highly contested, the idea of a net revenue-neutral tax on carbon dioxide emissions has been proposed by a number of economists from across the ideological spectrum as one possible way to help level the playing field among different sources of energy by accounting for the potential externalities of carbon emissions. At the same time other economists have criticized carbon pricing, both from the right and the left, as either a Utopian scheme inappropriate to address a global problem or as a band-aid that will not fundamentally limit carbon emissions. In a revenue-neutral carbon tax regime, all revenues generated from taxes on carbon emissions would be directly returned to the taxed economy through an equivalent reduction in other existing taxes or through direct payments to taxpayers. Depending on the particular structure utilized, these may be referred to as a “revenue-neutral carbon tax” or a “carbon tax shift/swap” or a “carbon fee and dividend”. What the arguments for such a policy structure, both pro and con, have often lacked is detailed analysis of the performance and design of revenue-neutral carbon taxes in the real world. This paper attempts to address that gap. It examines the revenue-recycling carbon pricing mechanisms already enacted in British Columbia and Australia in order to assess their approach and efficacy.

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