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Herbert and Jane Dwight Working Group on Islamism and the International Order: Members

Fouad Ajami is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution
herbert and jane dwight senior fellow
cochair, working group on islamism and the international order

Fouad Ajami is the Herbert and Jane Dwight Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the cochair of the Herbert and Jane Dwight Working Group on Islamism and the International Order. From 1980 to 2011 he was director of Middle East Studies at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The Arab Predicament, The Vanished Imam: Musa al Sadr and the Shia of Lebanon, Beirut: City of Regrets, The Dream Palace of the Arabs, and The Foreigner's Gift: The Americans, the Arabs, and the Iraqis in Iraq. His most recent publication is The Syrian Rebellion (Hoover Institution Press, 2012). His writings also include some four hundred essays on Arab and Islamic politics, US foreign policy, and contemporary international history. Ajami has received numerous awards, including the Benjamin Franklin Award for public service (2011), the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2011), the Bradley Prize (2006), the National Humanities Medal (2006), and the MacArthur Fellows Award (1982). His research has charted the road to 9/11, the Iraq war, and the US presence in the Arab-Islamic world.

Last updated on July 9, 2013
Charles Hill
research fellow
cochair, working group on islamism and the international order

Charles Hill, a career minister in the US Foreign Service, is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and cochair of the Working Group on Islamism and the International Order. He was executive aide to former US secretary of state George P. Shultz (1983–89) and served as special consultant on policy to the secretary-general of the United Nations (1992–96). He is also the Brady-Johnson Distinguished Fellow in Grand Strategy and a senior lecturer in humanities at Yale. His most recent book is Trial of a Thousand Years: World Order and Islamism (Hoover Institution Press, 2011).

Among Hill's awards are the Superior Honor Award from the Department of State in 1973 and 1981; the Presidential Distinguished Service Award in 1987 and 1989; and the Secretary of State's Medal in 1989. He was granted an honorary doctor of laws degree by Rowan University.

His research papers are available at the Hoover Institution Archives.

Last updated on July 3, 2013
Russell A. Berman
senior fellow
member of the working group on islamism and the international order

Russell A. Berman, the Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Working Group on Islamism and the International Order.

Berman specializes in German culture and is a member of both the Department of German Studies and the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford University. He is the author of numerous articles and books including Enlightenment or Empire: Colonial Discourse in German Culture (1998) and The Rise of the Modern German Novel: Crisis and Charisma (1986), both of which won the Outstanding Book Award of the German Studies Association. Other books include Anti-Americanism in Europe: A Cultural Problem (2004), Fiction Sets You Free: Literature, Liberty and Western Culture (2007), and, most recently, Freedom or Terror: Europe Faces Jihad (2010).

Last updated on November 28, 2011
Abbas M. Milani
research fellow
member of the working group on islamism and the international order

Abbas Milani is a research fellow and codirector of the Iran Democracy Project at the Hoover Institution. In addition, Milani is the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University. His expertise is US/Iran relations and Iranian cultural, political, and security issues.

Before coming to Hoover, Milani was a professor of history and political science and chair of the department at Notre Dame de Namur University and a research fellow at the Institute of International Studies at the University of California at Berkeley, in addition to being an assistant professor in the faculty of law and political science at Tehran University and a member of the board of directors of Tehran University's Center for International Studies from 1979 to 1987. Milani was a research fellow at the Iranian Center for Social Research from 1977 to 1978 and an assistant professor at the National University of Iran from 1975 to 1977.

Last updated on May 8, 2012
Samuel Tadros
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Samuel Tadros is a contributor to the Hoover Institution's Herbert and Jane Dwight Working Group on Islamism and the International Order. He is also a research fellow at the Hudson Institute's Center for Religious Freedom and a professorial lecturer at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. Before joining Hudson in 2011, Tadros was a senior partner at the Egyptian Union of Liberal Youth, an organization that aims to spread the ideas of classical liberalism in Egypt.

Last updated on July 24, 2013
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Zeyno Baran is the director of the Hudson Institute's Center for Eurasian Policy and a senior fellow at the Hudson's Center on Islam, Democracy and the Future of the Muslim World. She previously directed the International Security and Energy Programs at the Nixon Center; before that she directed the Georgia Forum and the Caucasus Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Marius Deeb, who obtained his doctorate from Oxford University, is a leading authority on Middle Eastern politics and history. Professor Deeb teaches at the School of Advanced International Studies of John Hopkins University; he previously taught at Indiana University, the American University of Beirut, and Georgetown University. His publications include Party Politics in Egypt: The Wafd and Its Rivals, 1919–1939, The Lebanese Civil War, Libya since Revolution: Aspects of Social and Political Development (coauthored with Mary-Jane Deeb), Militant Islamic Movements in Lebanon: Origins, Social Basis and Ideology, and Syria’s Terrorist War on Lebanon and the Peace Process. Deeb’s research interests include political parties and movements, militant Islam in all its varieties, the Christian communities of the Middle East, and Islam and the West.

Reuel Marc Gerecht
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Reuel Marc Gerecht is a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies specializing in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Islamic militancy, and terrorism. His most recent publication is The Wave: Man, God, and the Ballot Box in the Middle East (Hoover Institution Press, 2011). Other books include A Spy's Journey into Revolutionary Iran and The Islamic Paradox. Gerecht was a case officer in the Central Intelligence Agency's Clandestine Service focusing on the Middle East. Previously, he was a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the director of the Middle East Initiative at the Project for New American Century. Gerecht is a graduate of Johns Hopkins, Edinburgh, and Princeton Universities.

Last updated on May 17, 2011
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Nibras Kazimi is a visiting scholar at the Hudson Institute. Previously, he directed the Research Bureau of the Iraqi National Congress in Washington, D.C., and Baghdad and was a pro bono adviser to the Higher National Commission for De-Ba'athification, which he helped establish and staff. He also contributed regular columns to the New York Sun and Prospect Magazine (UK).

Kazimi's research focuses on the growing threat of jihadism in the Middle East, as well as prospects for democracy in the region. His primary interest is the national security of Iraq and how threats to the nascent democracy there are enabled and coordinated by regional Middle Eastern actors and factors. He travels widely; recently he visited Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, and Jordan.

contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Bernard Lewis is the Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton University. A widely read expert on the Middle East, he is regarded as one of the West’s leading scholars on the region. He has published numerous books; the most recent is titled The End of Modern History in the Middle East (Hoover Institution Press, 2011).

Last updated on May 17, 2011
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Habib C. Malik was born in Washington, D.C., the son of Lebanese philosopher and diplomat Charles Malik. He is currently an associate professor of history and cultural studies at the Lebanese American University (Byblos campus). He is the author of Between Damascus and Jerusalem: Lebanon and Middle East Peace; Receiving Soren Kierkegaard: The Early Impact and Transmission of His Thought and editor of The Challenge of Human Rights: Charles Malik and the Universal Declaration, along with many articles, essays, and book chapters in both Arabic and English on pluralism, Arab Christians, human rights, Political Islam, and the Arab reception of Kierkegaard.

contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Camille Pecastaing is a senior associate professor of Middle East studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. A student of behavioral sciences and historical sociology, his research focuses on the cognitive and emotive foundations of xenophobic political cultures and ethnoreligious violence, using the Muslim world and its European and Asian peripheries as a case study. He has written on political Islam, Islamist terrorism, social change, and globalization. Pecastaing’s latest publication is Jihad in the Arabian Sea.

Last updated on July 20, 2011
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Lieutenant Colonel Joel Rayburn is a US Army strategic intelligence officer with twenty years’ experience in national security and political-military affairs, focusing on the greater Middle East.  He has served in multiple assignments in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf region.  He is currently a research fellow at the National Defense University in Washington, DC.; a member of the Hoover Institution’s Working Group on Islamism and the International Order; and an adjunct military fellow at the New America Foundation.

Last updated on February 7, 2013
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Lee Smith is a senior editor at the Weekly Standard and a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. He also writes a regular column, “Agents of Influence,” about US foreign policy and the Middle East, for Tablet Magazine. His book The Strong Horse: Power, Politics, and the Clash of Arab Civilizations was published in January 2010 by Doubleday. Smith has been a guest commentator on radio and television, including CNN, Fox News, and National Public Radio.

Last updated on April 11, 2014
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w. glenn campbell and rita ricardo-campbell national fellow, 2008–09
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Joshua Teitelbaum is a senior fellow at Tel Aviv University's Dayan Center for Middle Eastern Studies and principal research associate at the Global Research in International Affairs Center, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya. He is currently a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a visiting scholar at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, both at Stanford University. A noted scholar on Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf, he is author of Holier Than Thou: Saudi Arabia's Islamic Opposition and editor of Political Liberalization in the Persian Gulf (Columbia University Press, 2009).

Joshua Teitelbaum was a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow for 2008–2009 at the Hoover Institution.

Last updated on March 19, 2012
Tunku Varadarajan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution
virginia hobbs carpenter fellow in journalism
contributor to the working group on islamism and the international order

Tunku Varadarajan is the Virginia Hobbs Carpenter Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and editor of Hoover’s in-house publication Defining Ideas. A writer-at-large at the Daily Beast, he was a former editor of Newsweek and Newsweek International. Previously, he was executive editor (opinions) at Forbes, assistant managing editor and op-ed editor of the Wall Street Journal, and the New York bureau chief for The Times (of London). Born in India, he is a British citizen. A visiting scholar at New York University's Department of Journalism, he is a former lecturer in law at Trinity College, Oxford. He has also taught at NYU's Stern School of Business, the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Varadarajan has a BA in law, with honors, from Oxford University.

Last updated on March 6, 2014