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Jean Perkins Task Force on National Security and Law: Members

Peter Berkowitz
tad and dianne taube senior fellow
chair, national security and law task force
cochair, virtues of a free society task force
member, military history working group
member, working group on foreign policy and grand strategy
Peter Berkowitz is the Tad and Dianne Taube Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, where he chairs the Jean Perkins Task Force on National Security and Law and cochairs the Working Group on the Virtues of a Free Society. He is the author of Constitutional Conservatism: Liberty, Self-Government, and Political Moderation (Hoover, 2013); Israel and the Struggle over the International Laws of War (Hoover, 2012); Virtue and the Making of Modern Liberalism (Princeton, 1999); and Nietzsche: The Ethics of an Immoralist (Harvard, 1995). He has edited five books of essays on American political ideas and institutions and has published hundreds of articles, essays, and reviews on many subjects for a variety of publications. He holds a JD and a PhD in political science, from Yale University; an MA in philosophy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and a BA in English literature from Swarthmore College.
Last updated on June 10, 2013
Kenneth Anderson
member of the task force on national security and law

Kenneth Anderson is a professor of international law at Washington College of Law, American University, Washington, DC, and a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution. He specializes in international law. Formerly general counsel to the Open Society Institute and director of the Human Rights Watch Arms Division, Anderson has written Living with the UN: American Responsibilities and International Order (2012), and a new book with Benjamin Wittes, Speaking the Law: The Obama Administration’s Addresses on National Security Law (2013), both published by the Hoover Institution Press. Anderson blogs at the law professor websites Volokh Conspiracy and Opinio Juris, and is the book review editor of the national security law website Lawfare.

Last updated on April 9, 2013
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member of the task force on national security and law

Philip Bobbitt is the Herbert Wechsler Professor of Jurisprudence and director of the Center for National Security at Columbia Law School. He is also a senior fellow at the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas. He is the author of seven books, of which Terror and Consent:The Wars for the 21st Century (Knopf, 2008) is the most recent. He has served in various capacities in government, including posts at the White House (associate counsel to president), the Senate (legal counsel to the Iran-Contra Committee), the State Department (the counselor on international law), and the National Security Council (director for intelligence programs, senior director for critical infrastructure, and senior director for strategic planning). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives in New York, Austin, and London.

Jack Goldsmith
senior fellow
member of the task force on national security and law

Jack Goldsmith is the Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law at Harvard University and the author, most recently, of Power and Constraint: The Accountable Presidency after 9/11 (W.W. Norton, 2012) and many other books and articles related to terrorism, national security, and international law. Before coming to Harvard, Goldsmith served in 2003–4 as assistant attorney general, Office of Legal Counsel, and in 2002–3 as special counsel to the general counsel to the Department of Defense. Goldsmith holds a JD from Yale Law School, a BA and an MA from Oxford University, and a BA from Washington and Lee University. He clerked for Supreme Court justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Court of Appeals judge J. Harvie Wilkinson, and Judge George Aldrich on the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal. Goldsmith is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Last updated on December 4, 2013
Stephen Krasner
senior fellow
member, national security and law task force
cochair, working group on foreign policy and grand strategy

Stephen D. Krasner is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations at Stanford University, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He was director of the policy planning staff at the Department of State (2005–7), director for governance and development at the National Security Council (2002). In 2003–4 he was deputy director of the Freeman Spogli Institute and director of the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at the institute, as well as a member of the board of directors of the United States Institute of Peace. He received his B.A. from Cornell, M.A. from Columbia, and Ph.D. from Harvard. He is the author of Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (Princeton: 1999), several other books, and more than eighty articles. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Last updated on October 8, 2010
Shavit Matias bio photo
research fellow
member of the task force on national security and law

Shavit Matias is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution specializing in globalization, national security, international disputes, and international law. Between 2004 and 2013 she was deputy attorney general of Israel in charge of international issues. In that capacity she was closely involved in advising the government on policy and law on international and national security matters and represented Israel in international forums and international negotiations and disputes. She was a member of Israeli National Security Council teams on a wide range of matters relating to national security challenges, international law, Middle East policy, terrorism, international conflicts, and other international issues and headed various interministerial committees examining and advising on questions of law, policy, and national security.

Since 1992 Matias has been an adjunct professor teaching courses on international law, globalization, international dispute settlement mechanisms, the Middle East conflict, and international negotiations at academic institutions including Georgetown University Law Center, the Hebrew University, Tel-Aviv University, and Stanford University. She is a recipient of the 2008 Award from Georgetown University Law Center for outstanding achievements in the profession.

She received her LLB from Tel-Aviv University, her LLM from Georgetown University, and her doctorate in international law from George Washington University.

Last updated on August 1, 2013
Jessica Stern
member of the task force on national security and law

Jessica Stern consults with various government agencies on counter-terrorism policy. In 2009, she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for her work on trauma and violence.  She has authored Terror in the Name of God, selected by the New York Times as a notable book of the year; The Ultimate Terrorists; and numerous articles on terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. She served on President Clinton’s National Security Council Staff in 1994–95 and is a member of the Trilateral Commission and the Council on Foreign Relations. She was named a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow, a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Fellow of the World Economic Forum, and a Harvard MacArthur Fellow. She has a BS from Barnard College in chemistry, an MA from MIT in chemical engineering/technology policy, and a PhD from Harvard University in public policy.

Matthew Waxman
member of the task force on national security and law

Matthew Waxman is a professor of law at Columbia Law School and an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He previously served as principal deputy director of policy planning (2005–7) and acting director of policy planning (2007) at the US Department of State. He also served as deputy assistant secretary of defense for detainee affairs (2004–5), director for contingency planning and international justice at the National Security Council (2002–3), and special assistant to National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice (2001–2). He is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School. He served as law clerk to Supreme Court justice David H. Souter and US Court of Appeals judge Joel M. Flaum. His publications include The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might (Cambridge University Press, 2002).

Last updated on July 9, 2012
Ruth Wedgwood
member of the task force on national security and law

Ruth Wedgwood is the Burling Professor of International Law at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Earlier in her career, as a federal prosecutor in New York, she prosecuted a Soviet-bloc nuclear spy and weapons dealers’ shipping to Iraq and Iran. She also devised the innovative trial procedures first used in the Kampiles espionage case and later incorporated in the Classified Information Procedures Act. She has served on the Defense Policy Board, the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on International Law, and the CIA Historical Review Panel. She currently serves as the U.S. member of the United Nations Human Rights Committee in Geneva, reviewing the human rights record of countries such as Russia, Belarus, Libya, and Algeria. She was educated at Harvard, the London School of Economics, and Yale Law School and clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Benjamin Wittes
member of the task force on national security and law

Benjamin Wittes is a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and codirector of the Harvard Law School–Brookings Project on Law and Security. His most recent publication is Speaking the Law (Hoover Institution Press 2013), cowritten with Kenneth Anderson. He is the cofounder of the Lawfare blog.

Last updated on June 24, 2013
Amy Zegart is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution
davies family senior fellow
associate director, academic affairs
member, task force on national security and law
member, arctic security initiative
member, military history working group
member, hoover ip squared working group steering committee
cochair, working group on foreign policy and grand strategy

Amy Zegart, a Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, professor (by courtesy) at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, and co-director of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation, was previously a professor of public policy at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. Zegart’s research examines organizational development, adaptation, and innovation in national security policy. Her most recent book is Eyes on Spies: Congress and the United States Intelligence Community; she also authored the award-winning books Flawed by Design and Spying Blind. She publishes in leading political science journals, including International Security and Political Science Quarterly. Zegart served on the NSC and on the National Academies of Science Panel to Improve Intelligence Analysis and as a foreign policy adviser to the Bush-Cheney 2000 presidential campaign. She worked as a management consultant at McKinsey & Company advising firms on strategy and organizational effectiveness.

Last updated on December 17, 2013