Edward Paul Lazear

Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow
Research Team: 
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Econometric Society (elected fellow)
American Association for the Advancement of Sciences
Society of Labor Economists
Biography: 

Edward P. Lazear is the Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Davies Family Professor of Economics at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Lazear served at the White House from 2006 to 2009, where he was chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Before coming to Stanford, he taught at the University of Chicago.

Lazear has received numerous honors and prizes: among them, the 1998 Leo Melamed Biennial Prize for the best research by a business school professor, the 2004 Prize for Outstanding Contributions to Labor Economics from the Institute for the Study of Labor, and the 2006 Jacob Mincer Prize for lifetime achievement in the field of labor economics. He holds four honorary degrees, the most recent from the Copenhagen Business School (2013).

Founding editor of the Journal of Labor Economics and founder of the Society of Labor Economists, he is also an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Econometric Society, and the Society of Labor Economists. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Testing and Assessment. Lazear was the first vice-president and then president of the Society of Labor Economists.

Lazear has written or edited a dozen books including Personnel Economics (MIT Press, 1995), which expands on his 1993 Wicksell Lectures. He has published more than one hundred papers in leading professional journals.

He received the Distinguished Teaching Award from Stanford University's Graduate School of Business in 1994 and the Distinguished Service Award from Stanford University in 2002.

Lazear holds AB and AM degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a PhD from Harvard University.

Lazear's vitae and papers can be accessed through his personal webpage at http://faculty-gsb.stanford.edu/lazear/.

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Recent Commentary

Policy BriefsFeatured

Edward Lazear On How To Reduce Income Inequality

by Edward Paul Lazearvia PolicyEd
Thursday, February 21, 2019

Tax policy and redistribution do not solve the underlying structural problem of income inequality. Redistribution and tax policy are only temporary fixes. For a permanent solution, we need to focus on reducing the skills gap by increasing the skills of individuals at the bottom of the income distribution.

Featured

Edward Lazear On How To Reduce Income Inequality

by Edward Paul Lazearvia PolicyEd
Thursday, February 21, 2019

Tax policy and redistribution do not solve the underlying structural problem of income inequality. Redistribution and tax policy are only temporary fixes. For a permanent solution, we need to focus on reducing the skills gap by increasing the skills of individuals at the bottom of the income distribution.

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There’s Room to Grow

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 25, 2019

The economy appears to be approaching full employment—without approaching limits on its ability to keep expanding. We’re going well, in a word, but not overdoing it.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Policy Insights: Free Trade

featuring Milton Friedman, John B. Taylor, John H. Cochrane , Edward Paul Lazear, Michael J. Boskin, Richard A. Epstein, Russell Roberts, Tom Churchvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, January 23, 2019

After a generation of trade liberalizations, many Americans—on the left and the right—are having second thoughts.

IntellectionsFeatured

Enhancing Economic Growth Through Immigration

by Edward Paul Lazearvia PolicyEd
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Immigration has always been a vital component of economic growth in the United States, and certain types of immigrants are more likely to start businesses than others. Younger, more educated immigrants are more likely to be entrepreneurial, as are immigrants who come from countries that haven’t traditionally sent many people to America. The United States could boost its economy if it rebalanced its immigration system to give them a preferred path for green cards.

Featured

Why The Fed Should Heed The Market

by Edward Paul Lazearvia The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, perhaps hoping to instill confidence, said in his press conference last month, “Of course we’re always data dependent.” But which data? There are countless indicators economists can seek out to track growth, employment and inflation. Picking the right ones is half the battle in making sound predictions.

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Water Policy Reform: Economic Policy Challenges Facing California’s Next Governor

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Institution
Monday, October 29, 2018

California is a drought-prone state. Since 1960, the population of California has more than doubled. This suggests that the problem is that population growth in the state has made it difficult to supply enough water to accommodate the larger population. Although true to some extent, this is a minor cause of our water difficulties.

Featured

America’s Economy Isn’t Overheating

by Edward Paul Lazearvia The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

[Subscription Required] The U.S. unemployment rate declined to 3.7%, a rate unseen in almost half a century, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. Given the booming labor market, the Federal Reserve has reason to worry that the economy may be overheating.

Featured

Keep Your Tariffs Off My Harley

by Edward Paul Lazearvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, August 27, 2018
The problem is the tariffs, not Harley-Davidson’s response.
Featured

Send Us Your Young, Your Educated

by Edward Paul Lazearvia The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

[Subscription Required] The U.S. is in the enviable position of having an excess supply of potential immigrants. Only about 1 in 5 who apply for green cards in any year are awarded resident status. This means that America can, to a large extent, choose which immigrants it wants. Whom should it choose?

Click here to see What's Behind the Numbers?.

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