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Joshua Teitelbaum

W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow, 2008–09
Biography: 

Joshua Teitelbaum was a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow for 2008–2009 and was in residence from March to July 2009.

Teitelbaum is a senior fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Tel Aviv University, and the Goldman Visiting Associate Professor at Stanford’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law.

His research interests include Saudi Arabia, U.S. Middle East policy, and liberalization in the Middle East. He is an associate of the Proteus Management Group; the U.S. Army War College, Office of the Director, National Intelligence; and a captain (res.) in the Israel Defense Forces. Teitelbaum is the author of Holier Than Thou: Saudi Arabia’s Islamic Opposition; Political Liberalization in the Persian Gulf (editor); and The Rise and Fall of the Hashemite Kingdom of Arabia. He received a grant from the Israel Science Foundation for his current work on tribe, Islam, and jihad in Saudi Arabia. Teitelbaum received his PhD in Middle Eastern history from Tel Aviv University.

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Recent Commentary

The Kingdom of Caution

The Kingdom of Caution

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

The land where stability vies ceaselessly with stagnation. By Joshua Teitelbaum.

Analysis and Commentary

Circling the Wagons: Middle Eastern Monarchies Confront the ‘Arab Spring’

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, June 13, 2011

The events of the “Arab Spring” are still unfolding, but for the monarchies of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), this “spring” offers little promise...

Circling the Wagons: Middle Eastern Monarchies Confront the 'Arab Spring'

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, June 13, 2011

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The events of the “Arab Spring” are still unfolding, but for the monarchies of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), this “spring” offers little promise.

Analysis and Commentary

Saudi Arabia, Iran and America in the Wake of the Arab Spring

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Many in the West have looked upon the “Arab Spring” with hopeful optimism. But for the rulers of Riyadh the Arab Spring’s primary result has been a shaking of the strategic foundation and alignments that have shaped Saudi regional policy since the 1979 Iranian Revolution...

Saudi Arabia, Iran and America in the Wake of the Arab Spring

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Tuesday, May 24, 2011

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Many in the West have looked upon the “Arab Spring” with hopeful optimism.

Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and “the Day of Rage” that Wasn’t

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Tuesday, April 5, 2011

While unrest has rattled the Middle East in recent months, Saudi Arabia has taken all necessary measures to maintain stability within its own borders. Its success in doing so stems from two factors: oil wealth and tradition.

In the News

Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and “the Day of Rage” that Wasn’t

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia BESA Center for Strategic Studies
Monday, April 4, 2011

While unrest has rattled the Middle East in recent months, Saudi Arabia has taken all necessary measures to maintain stability within its own borders. Its success in doing so stems from two factors: oil wealth and tradition...

Analysis and Commentary

Saudi Arabia and the King’s Dilemma

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, March 16, 2011

As it has always done, [Saudi Arabia] will adjust the pace of its reforms in an attempt to satisfy reformists while balancing the dominant conservative trend in society...

Saudi Arabia and the King’s Dilemma

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Bottom Line: Saudi Arabia has the tools to weather the current storm. Its internal security forces are numerous and loyal, it is flush with oil wealth, the King is popular (although infirm), and the majority of Saudis are far from likely to take to the streets.

Saudi Arabia Contends with the Social Media Challenge

by Joshua Teitelbaumvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Although they express admiration, Saudis and Gulf residents have no desire to see the chaos on the streets of Cairo and Tunis repeat itself in the squares of Jeddah and Riyadh.

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