Peter R. Mansoor

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Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

Blast From The Past: The Strategic Realignment Of The United States In The Trump Administration

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Thursday, January 26, 2017

As Donald Trump assumes office as the nation’s 45th president, questions swirl regarding the strategic trajectory and alignment of the United States during his administration. Mr. Trump campaigned on a platform of putting “America First,” but the policy details of what exactly this means were, to put it mildly, lacking.

EssaysBlank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Destruction Of ISIS

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Hoover Institution Press
Friday, December 9, 2016

The goal of the United States and its allies must be the total eradication of the Islamic State. Destroying ISIS begins with eliminating its self-styled caliphate in Iraq and Syria. This can be accomplished by arming local actors and assisting them with advisers, forward air control teams, and airpower. More importantly, the United States must work with regional partners to knit together a political solution to provide Iraqi and Syrian Sunni Arabs a measure of autonomy to prevent the reemergence of ISIS or its ideological successor. The United States must also wage a holistic campaign to combat ISIS elsewhere in the world. Means include pressuring ISIS affiliates through drone strikes and by strengthening partner states, using financial and legal means to impede terrorist financing, combating radicalization in cyberspace and on social media platforms, and focusing intelligence capabilities to uncover ISIS operatives seeking to conduct terror attacks in Europe and the United States.

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Turkey And The Kurds

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Friday, August 26, 2016

On Wednesday, August 24, Turkish forces launched a major ground assault into Syria, spearheaded by a battalion of Leopard tanks and Special Forces troops and supported by U.S. airpower. The attack was aimed at the town of Jarablus, astride the Euphrates River. The town was speedily liberated from militants of the Islamic State, who had held it for nearly two and a half years. 

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Changes Of Command

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Monday, August 22, 2016

The Iraqi Army, Kurdish Peshmerga, and perhaps a few Shi’ite militias are preparing for the largest battle in the war against the Islamic State: the seizure of Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq. They will be supported in this difficult endeavor by a U.S.-led coalition featuring combat advisers and a lethal mix of manned and unmanned aircraft ready to launch salvos of precision guided munitions onto the enemy below.

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The Martial Aspects Of The Olympic Games

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Monday, August 15, 2016

As the Rio Olympics reach their mid-way point, it is instructive to reflect on the ancient martial origins of the games and how they have been used throughout history to reflect the power of cities and states through the lens of champion athletes.

Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

Is Another 9/11 Possible?

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Monday, August 15, 2016

At 8:46 a.m. on Tuesday, September 11, 2001, Egyptian terrorist Mohammed Atta and four Saudi accomplices flew hijacked American Airlines Flight 11 into the North Tower of the World Trade Center, killing all 92 passengers and crew on board as well as hundreds more inside the building. 

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Generals And Politics

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Monday, August 8, 2016

Following the recent appearances of retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and retired General John Allen at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, retired General Martin Dempsey, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, admonished retired senior leaders not to endorse political candidates. “As generals, they have an obligation to uphold our apolitical traditions,” Dempsey wrote. Through the broad sweep of American history, however, the “apolitical traditions” of the military are hardly clear-cut.

Related Commentary

The Iran Deal Offers Little Hope for Optimism

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, May 27, 2016

On April 2, 2015, President Barrack Obama stepped to the microphone in the White House Rose Garden and declared, “Today, the United States—together with our allies and partners—has reached a historic understanding with Iran, which, if fully implemented, will prevent it from obtaining a nuclear weapon.” Regrettably, history provides little comfort that the accord will prevent a determined Tehran from acquiring the bomb. 

Autobiography & Memoir

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa, by E.B. Sledge (1981)

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Classics of Military History
Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Eugene B. Sledge, the son of a doctor from Alabama, enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1942 and fought with the 1st Marine Division on Peleliu and Okinawa. His wartime memoir, With the Old Breed, chronicles his experiences in some of the bloodiest fighting of the Pacific war against Japan. It is a story about the humanity, and utter lack thereof, in war. 

Weapons & Technology

The Military Revolution: Military Innovation and the Rise of the West, 1500-1800, by Geoffrey Parker (1988)

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Classics of Military History
Tuesday, March 22, 2016

The advent of gunpowder weapons dramatically changed warfare during the late Middle Ages and early modern periods. Gunpowder was a Chinese invention. Why then was it the West that came to adopt it so completely and use the weaponry designed to employ it to put itself in a position to dominate much of the world by the 19th century? 

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