China Leadership Monitor

China Leadership Monitor

Subscribe to receive the China Leadership Monitor. Subscribe »

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Winter 2018 Issue 55

Contributing Commentator
Contributing Commentator

The 19th Party Congress: Ringing in Xi Jinping’s New Age

by Joseph Fewsmithvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

The 19th Party Congress and the First Plenary Session of the 19th Central Committee that immediately followed the congress endorsed sweeping changes in China’s leadership, including the makeup of the Politburo and its standing committee.

Foreign Policy
Foreign Policy

Chinese Views of Foreign Policy in the 19th Party Congress

by Michael D. Swainevia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Foreign policy priorities and initiatives addressed at the 19th Party Congress confirm the end of China’s “hide and bide” period and demonstrate its growing interest in becoming a more influential player on the world stage.

Military Affairs
Military Affairs

The Cult of Xi and the Rise of the CMC Chairman Responsibility System

by James Mulvenonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Analyst coverage of the recent 19th Party Congress has emphasized the “cult of Xi” and the lack of a designated successor among the new civilian leadership team, as well as the ideological and normative content of the Central Committee work report delivered by party chief Xi Jinping. 

Economic Policy
Economic Policy

Economic Policy in the Aftermath of the 19th Party Congress

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Before the 19th Party Congress, economic policy was highly focused on ensuring a favorable environment for the congress.

Political Reform and Governance
Political Reform and Governance

Party All the Time: Governance and Society in the New Era

by Jessica Batkevia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

The 19th Party Congress provided further testament to the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to suffuse itself into all aspects of society and government. 

Party Affairs
Party Affairs

The 19th Central Committee Politburo

by Alice L. Millervia China Leadership Monitor
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

The 19th CCP Congress and the new Central Committee it elected followed longstanding norms in appointing a new party Politburo. 

E.g., 2 / 22 / 2018
E.g., 2 / 22 / 2018
Friday, January 9, 2009

Winter 2009: Issue 27

Special Topic: The Third Plenum's Rural Reforms

by Cheng Li Friday, January 9, 2009
article
by Joseph Fewsmith Friday, January 9, 2009
article

PRC-Tawain-United States

by Alan D. Romberg Friday, January 9, 2009
article

Military Affairs

by James Mulvenon Friday, January 9, 2009
article

Economic Policy

by Barry Naughton Friday, January 9, 2009
article

Party Affairs

by Alice L. Miller Friday, January 9, 2009
article
Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Fall 2008: Issue 26

PRC-Tawain-United States

by Alan D. Romberg Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article

Military Affairs

by James Mulvenon Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article

Political Reform

by Joseph Fewsmith Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article

Economic Policy

by Barry Naughton Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article

Party Affairs

by Alice L. Miller Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article

The Provinces

by Cheng Li Tuesday, September 2, 2008
article
Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Summer 2008: Issue 25

PRC-Tawain-United States

by Alan D. Romberg Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article

Military Affairs

by James Mulvenon Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article

Political Reform

by Joseph Fewsmith Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article

Economic Policy

by Barry Naughton Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article

Party Affairs

by Alice L. Miller Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article

The Provinces

by Cheng Li Tuesday, June 17, 2008
article
Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Spring 2008: Issue 24

PRC-Tawain-United States

by Alan D. Romberg Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

Military Affairs

by James Mulvenon Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

Political Reform

by Joseph Fewsmith Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

Economic Policy

by Barry Naughton Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

Party Affairs

by Alice L. Miller Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

The Provinces

by Cheng Li Wednesday, March 12, 2008
article

Pages

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Author

Section

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Military Affairs

Groupthink? PLA Leading Small Groups and the Prospect for Real Reform and Change in the Chinese Military

by James Mulvenonvia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, July 28, 2014

As a result of the 18th Party Congress and its subsequent plenums, especially the Third Plenum in the fall of 2013, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army has embarked on a broad set of institutional reforms, tackling training, political work, command and control, and corruption among others. These reform efforts fall under the purview of newly established “leading groups,” led by senior officials in the relevant offices. This article examines the personnel and institutional makeup of these new groups, outlines their declared and undeclared missions, and assesses the probability of their success.

Nuclear Weapons
China-Taiwan-United States

Sunshine Heats Up Taiwan Politics, Affects PRC Tactics

by Alan D. Rombergvia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, July 28, 2014

In Taiwan this spring, the “Sunflower” student-led occupation of the Legislative Yuan, continuing interparty stalemate over the cross-Strait trade in services agreement and Legislative Yuan supervision of cross-Strait negotiations, revision of the referendum law, and the fate of the 4th Nuclear Power Plant sparked bitter political conflict.  At the same time, both major parties have begun the process of choosing new leaders.  All of those developments are sure to have an impact not only on domestic politics but also on cross-Strait relations.  On the PRC side, Xi Jinping’s policy toward Taiwan continued to attract attention, with the unification-related messaging of late 2013 giving way to a more pragmatic approach. 

Foreign Policy

Chinese Views and Commentary on Periphery Diplomacy

by Michael D. Swainevia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, July 28, 2014

Recent Chinese initiatives that imply a more proactive approach in foreign and defense policy are the product of ongoing debate in Beijing over how to define PRC national interests toward China’s periphery.  Departing from Beijing’s approach during most of the reform era, they suggest a decreased emphasis on Deng Xiaoping’s longstanding exhortation for China to remain modest and maintain a low profile in its external relations.  Among the many questions this raises for China’s external relations going forward, the most important is how Beijing will reconcile the contradictory policy imperatives of deepening positive relations with neighboring countries while more firmly advancing China’s territorial and resource interests and claims.

The Provinces

Xi Jinping’s Inner Circle (Part 1: The Shaanxi Gang)

by Cheng Livia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

Like successful politicians elsewhere, President Xi Jinping assumed China’s top leadership role with the support of an inner circle. This group has been crucial to Xi’s efforts to consolidate power during his first year in office. This first article in a series of three focuses on native-place associations, namely the so-called Shaanxi Gang, which includes the “Iron Triangle” grouping in the Politburo Standing Committee. Such discussion can help reveal the future trajectory of politics and policy-making during the Xi administration. The analysis of the positioning and promotion of some of Xi’s longtime friends provides an invaluable assessment of both Xi’s current power and the potential for effective policy implementation.

Political Reform

Mao’s Shadow

by Joseph Fewsmithvia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

Nearly four decades after his death, Mao Zedong remains a controversial figure in Chinese Communist Party history, raising as he does questions of legitimacy. Over the past year the issue of how the Mao years should be evaluated in comparison to the reform years has been raised and discussed by Xi Jinping and others. This discussion apparently responds to divergent opinions in the party and seems to reflect Xi Jinping’s determination to define China’s ideology and its limits.

Economic Policy

After the Third Plenum: Economic Reform Revival Moves toward Implementation

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

The Third Plenum basically fulfilled the expectations placed on it, as it responded adequately to the credibility crisis that confronts Chinese policy today. New challenges of interpretation and implementation now rise to the fore. With the creation and staffing of the Reform Leadership Small Group, the initial outlines of the implementation process are coming into view. These show continued strong commitment to the goals of economic reform, but significant risks of reform strategy and implementation persist.

Military Affairs

Rearranging the Deck Chairs on the Liaoning?—The PLA Once Again Considers Reorganization

by James Mulvenonvia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

Since the first sweeping structural reform of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army in 1985, the military media have periodically floated trial balloons about deeper restructuring, but the political realities of the situation have consistently stymied the proposed changes. In early 2014, the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun reported that the PLA was planning to make the most significant modifications to its command and control structure in almost 30 years, replacing its administrative, geographically oriented military region system with a mission-oriented configuration designed to match the increasing “joint” orientation of its deployed forces. To the surprise of many, official Chinese media organs did not reject the report out of hand, but instead expressed dismay that the information had been disseminated prematurely, and grudgingly acknowledged plans to carry out the changes. This article describes the historical rationale for the current command and control structure of the PLA, analyzes the factors motivating its alteration, and assesses the implications of these latest indications of reform.

China-Taiwan-United States

From Generation to Generation: Advancing Cross-Strait Relations

by Alan D. Rombergvia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

When PRC leader Xi Jinping met with Taiwan’s former vice president Vincent Siew at the APEC leaders meeting in early October, he went beyond reiterating the standard position on the importance of promoting peaceful development of cross-Strait relations. Xi said that, in the “long term,” political differences between the two sides must be resolved and not be passed on from generation to generation. In this essay we explore that statement and its implications.

Foreign Policy

Chinese Views and Commentary on the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone

by Michael D. Swainevia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, March 14, 2014

China’s establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone has incited strong criticisms and increased regional tensions. Both authoritative and non-authoritative sources argue consistently and often emphatically that the zone is intended to improve safety and stability and is not directed at any particular country or target. Yet the vague language used to describe the zone, as well as the extensive and often hostile rhetoric toward Japan, suggests that such assertions are incorrect and disingenuous at best. While China has every right to set up an ADIZ, its failure to reassure other nations or clearly define the enforcement and intended impact of the zone has undermined any purported stabilizing intentions and damaged China’s larger strategic interests.

Party Affairs

How Strong Is Xi Jinping?

by Alice L. Millervia China Leadership Monitor
Thursday, March 13, 2014

Assessments of the political strength of Xi Jinping have varied widely over the year since he became China’s new top leader. This article addresses the question of Xi’s power in light of the results of the 18th Central Committee’s Third Plenum in November 2014 and of other recent trends.

Pages

CLM References

Stay Up To Date!

Be notified when an new issue is available.

Subscriptions »

The China Leadership Monitor seeks to inform the American foreign policy community about current trends in China's leadership politics and in its foreign and domestic policies. The Monitor proceeds on the premise that as China's importance in international affairs grows, American policy-makers and the broader policy-interested public increasingly need analysis of politics among China's leadership that is accurate, comprehensive, systematic, current, and relevant to major areas of interest to the United States.

China Leadership Monitor analysis rests heavily on traditional China-watching methods of interpreting information in China's state-controlled media. Use of these methods was once universal among specialists in contemporary Chinese affairs. Although the use of these methods has declined as opportunities to study China using other approaches have opened up in recent decades, their value in following politics among China's top leadership has not. Monitor analysis also brings to bear some of the new avenues of information and insight that have opened up since the normalization of U.S.-China relations and China's policy "opening to the outside world" in the late 1970s.

The China Leadership Monitor website is updated with new analyses quarterly.

Subscribe here to receive a free copy in your email inbox every quarter.

The China Leadership Monitor is sponsored by the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace at Stanford University. Its general editor is Hoover Institution research fellow Alice Miller.