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Policy Insights

Public Pensions

featuring Joshua D. Rauh, Russell Roberts, Tom Churchvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Public pension funds around the country have failed to set aside sufficient money to honor the pension promises they’ve made to workers in the public sector.

Intellections

What Democratic Socialism Does To Economic Prosperity

by Lee Ohanianvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Democratic socialism diminishes economic prosperity and ultimately requires a return to market-based policy.

Perspectives on Policy

Managing The China Challenge

by Larry Diamondvia PolicyEd
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Due to China’s covert, coercive, and corrupting efforts to gain cultural and informational influence, America must reevaluate its relationship with China and find ways to counter its attempts to manipulate American entities.

Intellections

A New Nuclear Strategy For 21st Century Realities

by James Goodbyvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Failing to move on from the Cold War mindset about nuclear weapons encourages their development and increases the risk that they will be used.

Policy Insights

The US Debt—Causes And Consequences

featuring John B. Taylor, Michael J. Boskin, John F. Cogan, John H. Cochrane, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

The federal government is borrowing at unprecedented rates. Spending regularly exceeds revenue, and this shortfall is predicted to grow dramatically in the near future. The result is a large and growing federal debt that threatens future Americans’ prosperity and security. What are the consequences of this higher federal debt and what can we do about it?

Friedman Fundamentals

What We Learned About 70% Tax Rates 50 Years Ago

by Milton Friedmanvia PolicyEd
Thursday, May 16, 2019

Milton Friedman explains what happened when federal tax rates actually reached seventy percent over fifty years ago. As tax rates go up, taxpayers have more of a reason to avoid paying those taxes. Loopholes go hand-in-hand with higher tax rates, which is why lower rates on a broader base of income leads to a more equitable system.

Friedman Fundamentals

Fellows With Friedman

featuring John H. Cochrane, Michael J. Boskin, David R. Henderson, Thomas Sowell, Richard A. Epstein, Alvin Rabushka, Robert E. Hallvia PolicyEd
Thursday, May 16, 2019

In a Wall Street Journalop-ed, “America Needs an Alternative Maximum Tax,” John Cochrane proposes a new kind of tax that caps the amount that people would pay in taxes to prevent indefinite tax-rate hikes. He asks, “How much is the most anyone should have to pay? When do taxes indisputably start to harm the economy and produce less revenue—when government takes 50% of people's income? 60%? 70%?” If there is a maximum amount that an individual pays, then once past that cap they wouldn’t pay any further federal income tax for that year.

The Numbers Game

Do The Rich Get All The Gains?

by Russell Robertsvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Has economic progress in America been shared widely or captured by only the rich? The standard story of stagnating wages takes snapshots of one set of people in the past and compares them to an entirely different set of people in the present. But when you follow the same people over time, it becomes clear that the poor and the middle class are prospering, often gaining more than the richest Americans.

Intellections

Party Instability: Why American Politics Feels Broken

by David Bradyvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

American politics feels broken because existing voting blocs are regrouping and reconsidering which issues motivate them and which political party they support. Ongoing economic and demographic structural changes have led to control of the legislative and executive branches shifting back and forth. While this is not the first time in the history this has occurred, political parties will need to figure out a winning combination of policies that can consistently win them elections in order to stabilize American politics.

Perspectives on Policy

Improving Educational Outcomes Through Innovation

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

While there are many reasons why public education performs poorly in the United States, the overriding cause is that it operates as a monopolistic system. Education is one area where improvement is genuinely in all of our interests. Public education can be improved through expanding the supply of schools, empowering parents, and diversifying within the existing monopoly.

Pages

Educating Americans about Public Policy

The digital media revolution has transformed the way people obtain information and form opinions. Countless partisan outlets peddle assertions and “sound bites” as indisputable facts. Few people have the knowledge and analytical skills to navigate this torrent of misinformation. They crave credible and accessible sources of facts, analysis, and information about proposed policies and the effects of those already enacted.


The Hoover Institution

Since its founding nearly 100 years ago, Stanford University’s Hoover Institution has sought to promote economic opportunity and prosperity, secure peace, and improve the human condition. Unique among policy research organizations, Hoover is part of a world-renowned university. In addition to being scholars, our fellows are educators.

Seeking to become the foremost source of policy knowledge, wisdom, and insights, we have launched the Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Initiative at the Hoover Institution, Educating Americans in Public Policy. The initiative seeks to:

  • Equip Americans with accurate facts and information, as well as a discerning analytical perspective, so they can better perform their civic duties, hold their elected leaders accountable, and “secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”
  • Provide political leaders with reliable knowledge and analysis—tools with which they might assess alternatives in the shaping and execution of public policy.

This effort will build on our legacy of substantive policy inquiry where partisan advocacy has become the norm.

 
The Hoover Institution acknowledges significant gifts in support of its Education Americans in Public Policy initiative from the following generous and committed family foundations and individuals:

    Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Family Foundation
    S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation
    Kurt and Julie Hauser
    E.A. and Suzanne Maas
    Frank and Mona Mapel