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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean
Background Essay
Background Essay

Turkey In The Eastern Mediterranean Crisis

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Three wars that Turkey is currently involved in, namely in Syria, Libya, and the South Caucasus, suggest that Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s foreign policy has settled into a new phase. Erdoğan is building a “mini Empire” by—often—simultaneously fighting and power- brokering with his Russian homologue, and to this end the Eastern Mediterranean provides ample opportunities for him.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not The Energy, Stupid!

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

In 2020, with the strong presence of American, Russian, French, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Italian, and even German warships, the Eastern Mediterranean has become one of the most militarized seas in the world.

Featured Commentary

Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

The Eastern Mediterranean, like the Middle East, is a tough neighborhood. The current standoff over natural gas rights among Greece, Turkey, and their respective allies is only the latest example.

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Poster Collection, IQ 2, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background Essay

Caliphate Redivivus? Why a Careful Look at the 7th Century Can Predict How the New Caliphate Will End

by Edward N. Luttwak via Strategika
Friday, August 1, 2014

When modern Muslims invoke the Khilāfa, the Caliphate as their ideal of governance for the Ummah, the planetary community of all Muslims, and indeed for all humans once converted or killed if stubbornly pagan, they do not refer to the famous caliphates of history from the splendiferous Umayyad, to the longer-lasting Abbasid extinguished by the Mongols in 1258, the Egypt-based and tolerant Fatimid in between, or the Ottoman that lingered till 1924, let alone the extant Ahmadiyya Caliphate that most condemn as heretical.

Cairo Punch 19, Hoover Institution Library.
Featured Commentary

The Rise and Inevitable Fall of the ISIS Caliphate

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, August 1, 2014

The recent seizure by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) of much of northern and western Iraq, along with its ongoing control of large swaths of eastern Syria, has reignited the question of the long-term goals of Islamist extremists. 

Poster Collection, INT 00398, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “A Brief History of Nuclear Weapons” with Josef Joffe

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

How and Why Countries Decide to go Nuclear.

Harold Melvin Agnew Motion Picture Film, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “A World of Nuclear Instability” with Josiah Bunting III

by Josiah Bunting IIIvia Strategika
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Examining the Prospects for the Future Use of Nuclear Weapons.

Related Commentary

Winning a Lose/Lose War

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Once again neighboring enemies are warring in diametrically opposite ways. Hamas sees the death of its civilians as an advantage; Israel sees the death of its civilians as a disaster. Defensive missiles explode to save civilians in Israel; in Gaza, civilians are placed at risk of death to protect offensive missiles.

Jerusalem
Related Commentary

The Incoherent Excuses for Hating Israel

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Monday, July 21, 2014

Israel’s military operation to degrade Hamas’ ability to rain rockets down on Israeli cities has stirred up the usual noisy and nasty protests in Europe. 

Related Commentary

Why Obama, Kerry, Abbas, Hamas, BDS, and Hezbollah Will All Go Poof!

by Edward N. Luttwak via Tablet Magazine
Sunday, July 20, 2014

In 1912, David Ben Gurion moved to Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, to study law at Istanbul University. The land of Israel had been under Ottoman rule for centuries, and the only way the Jews could grow their villages and towns, family by family, house by house, was to be accepted as loyal Ottoman subjects.

Harold Melvin Agnew Motion Picture Film, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “The Nuclear Future” with Williamson Murray

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Friday, July 18, 2014

The Prospects for Nuclear Proliferation in a Dangerous Age.

Poster Collection, INT 00398, Hoover Institution Archives.
Related Commentary

It’s Better Not to Play with Nukes

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Monday, July 14, 2014

The problem is that, if one of the children gets a new toy, all of the other kids want a new toy, too. Nor is this remark flippant, since a crucial issue here is the emotional maturity of the government, state, and population in question...

US flag on military helmet
Related Commentary

Today’s Military Needs to be Run More Like a Business

by Kori Schakevia Room for Debate (New York Times)
Monday, July 14, 2014

In the near term, the threats to our interests are numerous small-scale contingencies against militaries not our equal but with pockets of high-tech or disruptive capabilities, like nuclear weapons, cyber or accurate ballistic missiles. In the longer term, there is the potential for China to become a military threat that could challenge us across the military spectrum.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.