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Thursday, March 28, 2019

Issue 57

The Growth of Chinese Power and Influence
Background Essay
Background Essay

China Never Was A Superpower—And It Won’t Be One Anytime Soon

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

“The world by 2049 will be defined by the realization of Chinese power,” write Bradley Thayer and John Friend, referring to the centenary of the founding of the People’s Republic. “China,” these American academics tell us, “will be the world’s greatest economic and political force.” Must Americans accept the inevitability of Chinese dominance of the international system?

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

China’s Tide Is High, But Is It At High Tide?

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

If China’s explosive economic growth since the beginning of reform in 1979 is a unique success story, no less impressive has been the concomitant growth of its military and political power, as well as its global influence. Few could have predicted that within one generation of Richard Nixon’s visit to Beijing in 1972, China would vie with the United States for the banner of global leadership. By any measure, China’s efforts to surpass American predominance in the world must be taken seriously, and in some cases, may even seem to have succeeded. 

Featured Commentary

From Trade War To Tech War To Cold War

by Niall Fergusonvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

If you had told me 30 years ago America would be in another Cold War with another communist superpower by 2019, I would not have believed you. If you had told me that, simultaneously, socialism would be the height of fashion with young Americans, I would have directed you to a psychiatrist. But here we are. Three decades ago Francis Fukuyama published his seminal essay “The End of History?”, hailing the victory of liberal capitalism over all its ideological competitors, but especially over communism. The essay he needs to write today is “The Upend of History?”

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Related Commentary

Time to Annihilate ISIS; Here’s How

by Max Bootvia Commentary

The videotaped beheading of American journalist James Foley reveals both the barbarism and the weakness of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria).

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Airstrikes Can Only Do So Much to Combat ISIS

by Dr. Joseph Felter via The New York Times

At the tactical level, air-delivered munitions can significantly degrade the ability of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, to mass their forces or employ artillery, mortars, rockets and other weapons that can have a devastating impact on civilians as well as Iraqi military forces in the field.

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Ever Less Bang for the Buck

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika

A pacifist administration and an irresponsible Congress have made an unholy bargain that cuts muscle to preserve fat. 

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Airstrikes, Sure; but What About a Strategy in Iraq?

by Kiron K. Skinnervia The New York Times

It has been a tragically spectacular year for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has taken control of numerous towns in Iraq and Syria, seized energy assets, targeted religious minorities, unleashed murderous rampages against those who do not subscribe to its tenets, and declared a caliphate.

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Democracies Like Military Cuts

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com

http://www.frontpagemag.com/2014/bruce-thornton/democracies-like-military-cuts.

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How to Defeat ISIL

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U.S. policymakers must commit themselves clearly to containing, disrupting, and defeating it. 

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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