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The Religious Sources of Islamic Terrorism

by Shmuel Barvia Policy Review
Tuesday, June 1, 2004

What the fatwas say

Karachi, Pakistan
Analysis and Commentary

Some Sobering Thoughts on Pakistan's Future—and Ours

by Guity Nashatvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, March 29, 2004

We can help Pakistan achieve stability by discouraging policies that create unrest and encouraging policies that will benefit the struggling population.

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Rebuilding Kabul

by Michael Walkervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

After 23 years of war, the city slowly emerges from the rubble. By Michael Walker.

Now, Play the India Card

by Lloyd Macauley Richardsonvia Policy Review
Tuesday, October 1, 2002

Securing U.S. strategic interests in Asia

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Democracy in Afghanistan? Don’t Hold Your Breath

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 2002

Why we’re unlikely to see democracy in Afghanistan any time soon. By Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

Mutually Assured Destruction, South Asian Style

by Thomas W. Simons Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, October 30, 2000

In an alarming display of bravado in May 1998, longtime adversaries India and Pakistan tested their first nuclear weapons. Two years later, tensions between the two states remain high. Hoover fellow Thomas W. Simons Jr. assesses the prospects for peace.

Missile Deception

by Bill Gertzvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, October 30, 1999

U.S. intelligence learned as long ago as 1995 that China was selling nuclear technology to Pakistan—yet Washington did nothing. Hoover media fellow Bill Gertz explains how corporate interests waylaid the national interest.

India: Asia's Next Tiger?

via Analysis
Sunday, February 1, 1998

India, a rare democracy in the third world, is widely perceived to be a political success, despite its economic failures. India's poor choice of economic policies, however, has a political motivation. Getting elected has required targeting tangible spoils to an increasingly well-organized, but fractured, electorate. Political patronage was the stimulus for interventionist economic management, eventually producing massive fiscal deficits. When the danger of defaulting on foreign debt became a reality in 1991, the country's leadership began to reevaluate the flawed economic policies without considering the flawed system of governance that accompanied and sustained the policy matrix. Patronage politics spawned corruption; money, muscle, or influence propelled public services and government, making the system of public administration as incompatible with liberalism as the system of economic regulation. Political and administrative imperatives impelled the country to economic policies that failed. Economic reform will not be complete until the underlying administrative imperatives are transformed by accountable governance.

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