Economic Policy Working Group

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Analysis and Commentary

Low Birth Rates: Causes, Consequences, and Remedies

by Gary S. Beckervia Becker-Posner Blog
Sunday, August 18, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

What to Call This Very Slow Recovery?

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, August 12, 2013

Economists love the word “Great” for significant economic events—such as The Great Depression—probably using it too much.  I’m as guilty as anyone. I used the terms Great Inflation and Great Disinf...

Analysis and Commentary

Education and the Growth of Poverty in United States

by Gary S. Beckervia Becker-Posner Blog
Sunday, August 11, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Don Kohn on Rules-Based Monetary Policy

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Thursday, August 1, 2013

President Obama just widened the race for Fed chair. Up on Capitol Hill he mentioned Don Kohn along with Larry Summers and Janet Yellen. So we should widen the hunt for things that Don has said tha...

In the News

Here's Why Economists Hate Software Patents

with Gary S. Beckervia Washington Post
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Several economists, including two Nobel laureates, have argued that the software industry would be better off without patent protection.

Interviews

John Taylor on Bloomberg Television

with John B. Taylorvia Bloomberg Television
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Stanford University Professor John Taylor discusses the FOMC rate decision with Mark Crumpton on Bloomberg Television's "Bottom Line." (Source: Bloomberg)

Analysis and Commentary

Policy Uncertainty Makes Firms Reluctant to Hire: New Evidence

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

I have been arguing that economic policy--in particular policy unpredictability or uncertainty--has been a factor in the slow recovery.  That’s the main theme of the book I edited with Lee Ohanian ...

Analysis and Commentary

About Rules-Based Monetary Policy: Summers versus Yellen

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Monday, July 29, 2013

The financial press has narrowed down the race for the next Fed Chair to Larry Summers and Janet Yellen. Though there are other candidates with Democratic credentials, such as Alan Blinder and Tim ...

Interviews

Michael Boskin on the John Batchelor Show (31:57)

with Michael J. Boskinvia John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, July 23, 2013

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About

The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy at the Hoover Institution to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals. Read more...

Events

Archive of Working Papers on Economic Policy

Speeches and Testimony

John B. Taylor

Books

Media

Chair
George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Member
Wohlford Family Senior Fellow
Rose-Marie and Jack Anderson Senior Fellow
Leonard and Shirley Ely Senior Fellow
Senior Fellow
Senior Research Fellow
Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow

The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy at the Hoover Institution to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

 

Working Group Meeting - March 9, 2018
Working Group Meeting - March 9, 2018

For twenty-five years starting in the early 1980s, the United States economy experienced an unprecedented economic boom. Economic expansions were stronger and longer than in the past. Recessions were shorter, shallower, and less frequent. GDP doubled and household net worth increased by 250 percent in real terms. Forty-seven million jobs were created.

This quarter-century boom strengthened as its length increased. Productivity growth surged by one full percentage point per year in the United States, creating an additional $9 trillion of goods and services that would never have existed. And the long boom went global with emerging market countries from Asia to Latin America to Africa experiencing the enormous improvements in both economic growth and economic stability.

Economic policies that place greater reliance on the principles of free markets, price stability, and flexibility have been the key to these successes. Recently, however, several powerful new economic forces have begun to change the economic landscape, and these principles are being challenged with far reaching implications for U.S. economic policy, both domestic and international. A financial crisis flared up in 2007 and turned into a severe panic in 2008 leading to the Great Recession. How we interpret and react to these forces—and in particular whether proven policy principles prevail going forward—will determine whether strong economic growth and stability returns and again continues to spread and improve more people’s lives or whether the economy stalls and stagnates.

Our Working Group organizes seminars and conferences, prepares policy papers and other publications, and serves as a resource for policymakers and interested members of the public.

Working Group Meeting - April 9, 2008
Working Group Meeting - April 9, 2008

 


Contacts

For general questions about the Working Group, please contact John Taylor or his assistant Marie-Christine Slakey at (650) 723-9677. For media inquiries, please contact our office of public affairs.