Regions

Defense
interview with Michael McFaulvia PBS
Athens, Greece
by Josef Joffevia New York Times
interview with Michael McFaulvia NPR
interview with Michael Spencevia Bloomberg Television
Barack Obama
interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia John Batchelor Show
Chess pieces
by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)

Filter By:

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

Analysis and Commentary

China Plays The Japan Card

by Michael R. Auslinvia National Review
Friday, November 2, 2018

The heralded meeting last week between Chinese president Xi Jinping and Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe was touted by both leaders as opening a new era in Sino–Japanese relations.

Blank Section (Placeholder)

The Original “Great Game”

by Stephen Kotkinvia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 29, 2018

Duels between hegemons are as old as history itself. The nations wrestling over the fate of the world in our own time: China and the United States.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The Caravan

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, October 25, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses a caravan marching toward the US border as well as explosives delivered to celebrity Democrats.

Analysis and Commentary

In Cold War 2.0 Between The US And China, Put Your Money On Beyoncé

by Markos Kounalakisvia Miami Herald
Thursday, October 4, 2018

Beyoncé and Jay Z are proving that America has the diversity and creativity to survive the new China challenge. The musical duo inspires a new generation, shows America’s cultural strength, resilience and power — and just may help lead the world out of the new Cold War.

Interviews

Steven Davis: US Manufacturers Reassessing Investment Plans Due To Tariffs

interview with Steven J. Davisvia CNBC
Thursday, October 4, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Steven Davis discusses escalating trade friction between the U.S. and China.

Analysis and Commentary

It’s Not Just Trump. Much Of America Has Turned Its Back On Europe

by Timothy Garton Ashvia The Guardian
Friday, September 28, 2018
Can Donald Trump get any worse? Yes, he can. But our fixation on his personal awfulness, which was on full display at the UN this week, blinds us to the larger forces behind his Trumpery.
Analysis and Commentary

Iran And United States Play A High-Stakes Game Of Chicken

by Markos Kounalakisvia Miami Herald
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Iran and America entered a new and intense phase of word-slinging and trash-talking this week. Wars of words can sometimes lead to shooting wars or they can raise the stakes so high that negotiations become necessary to skirt conflict. Which will it be with Iran? Future talks or terror?

Analysis and Commentary

A Power Struggle In Berlin Masquerades As A War Between Good And Evil

by Josef Joffevia The Washington Post
Thursday, September 20, 2018

[Subscription Required] Germans are not renowned for their sense of humor, but this farce beats Monty Python. Imagine that President Trump had dismissed his FBI director by promoting him to undersecretary in the Justice Department, with a higher rank and salary.

In the News

If There Were No Borders, We Would Create Them

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Lexington Herald-Leader
Tuesday, September 4, 2018

A small, but fierce, nation known for taking territory from larger neighbors had its heyday in the 17th century, when a teenage boy became king and proved so brilliant in battle that he was later called the father of modern warfare. Because its aggression dates back hundreds of years, this now-peaceful country still inspires fear and distrust on the political left.

In the News

So Much For Summer Reading

quoting Amy Zegartvia Stanford News
Thursday, August 30, 2018

Faculty affiliated with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) have apparently moved on from the usual summer reading of spy thrillers and detective mysteries. Instead, they offer some serious reading recommendations about subjects ranging from national security policies to the Vietnam War to post-Soviet Union reality.

Pages

Research Teams