Government Regulation

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by John H. Cochranevia Wall Street Journal
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interview with Stephen Habervia Wall Street Journal Live
Economic Crisis
by John B. Taylorvia Wall Street Journal

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Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: The Specter Of Recession

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Thursday, August 22, 2019

When does the prospect of an economic slowdown justify government intervention?

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Area 45: Michael Boskin Discusses The Left’s Agenda

interview with Michael J. Boskinvia Area 45
Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Are Democratic hopefuls offering sound ideas (Green New Deal, Universal Basic Income, Medicare-For-All) or economic illiteracy?

Analysis and Commentary

Keynes' Understated Criticism Of FDR's New Deal

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, August 18, 2019

One main component of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal was the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), which cartelized hundreds of American industries. If FDR’s goal was, as the name of the act implies, to help industries recovered from the depth of the what would later be known as the Great Depression, the NIRA never made sense. When you cartelize an industry, you cut output and raise prices. With output being so low, you make the situation worse, not better.

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Area 45: Ed Lazear Assesses The Trump Economy

interview with Edward Paul Lazearvia Area 45
Wednesday, August 14, 2019

What might happen with tariffs, trade, currency manipulation, interest rates, employment, immigration, and the economy over the next year.

PoliticsFeatured

San Francisco’s “Overpaid CEO Tax” Won’t Solve Its Mental-Health And Drug Epidemics

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

It is now commonplace to criticize corporate CEOs within progressive political circles, so it is no surprise that San Francisco, one of the most politically progressive cities in the country, has proposed a tax on CEOs. But just not any CEO, only those with exceptionally high salaries compared with others in the company. Dubbed the “CEO Excessive Salary Tax,” the proposal would tax a company’s gross receipts depending on the difference between its CEO’s pay and the median salary of its workers.

Analysis and Commentary

Casey Mulligan On Trump Versus Reagan

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, August 2, 2019

University of Chicago economics professor Casey Mulligan, fresh off his one-year stint as chief economist with President Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers, has an interesting comparison of Trump vs. Reagan on economic deregulation.

Economic PolicyFeatured

San Francisco’s Flawed “IPO Tax” Proposal Would Tax So Much More

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, July 30, 2019

San Francisco supervisors thought they had designed a wealth tax that would hit only those benefiting from the initial public offerings (IPOs) of highly successful San Francisco technology businesses, such as Uber, Pinterest, and Airbnb, among others. Tech companies often compensate employees partially with stock, whose values can rise enormously in an IPO.

Analysis and Commentary

Lanhee Chen: $15 Minimum Wage May Do More Harm Than Good

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Townhall Review
Tuesday, July 23, 2019

The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives recently passed legislation to raise the minimum wage from $7.50 to $15 nationwide. While that might sound good to some, the reality is that such an increase may put up to 3.7 million people out of work, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

Featured

What Happens To Local Jobs When State Taxes Go Up?

featuring Joshua D. Rauhvia Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Monday, July 22, 2019

A new study, coauthored by Hoover Institution fellow and Stanford Graduate School of Business Finance Professor Joshua D. Rauh, offers a solid answer to what happens to local jobs when state taxes go up: Hiking the state corporate tax rate just one percentage point, say, from 6% to 7%, will indeed spur some companies to pull up stakes and take jobs with them.

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The Ministry of Labor

by Lee Ohanianvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

A proposed law would dramatically interfere with businesses’ right to hire and promote whom they want. California doesn’t need this Orwellian regulation.

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Economic Policy Working Group

 
The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

Milton and Rose Friedman: An Uncommon Couple