Teachers & Teaching

Education

Filter By:

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

In the News

Why America Lost So Many Of Its Black Teachers

quoting Eric Hanushekvia The Economist
Monday, July 8, 2019

Before 1964 nearly half of college-educated African-Americans in the South were teachers.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Area 45: The School Spending Disconnect With Paul Peterson

interview with Paul E. Petersonvia Area 45
Monday, July 8, 2019

Why money isn’t the sole cure to what ails America’s schools.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Uncommon Knowledge With David Berlinski On “The Deniable Darwin”

interview with David Berlinskivia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, July 8, 2019

Is Charles Darwin’s theory fundamentally deficient? David Berlinski makes his case, noting that most species enter the evolutionary order fully formed and then depart unchanged. Where there should be evolution, there is stasis. So, was Darwin wrong?

Analysis and Commentary

Student Outcomes Have Improved In More Than Just Reading And Math

by Michael J. Petrillivia The Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, June 19, 2019

As I indicated last week, I plan to spend the summer writing about whether our schools have improved over the past quarter-century or so—essentially the “reform era.”

Featured

A Salute To Great Teachers

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, June 17, 2019

Now there is a man who deserves our admiration: the man who taught English to the young Churchill, who in turn became one of the language’s greatest masters — second only to Shakespeare, in my view. Robert Somervell, like Hammond, dedicated his life to teaching. He did not aspire to be prime minister, for teachers are generally modest types. But should we admire only the ambitious?

Analysis and Commentary

Teacher Diversity Is Yet Another Area Where Charter Schools Excel

by Amber M. Northern, Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

As conservatives working in education, we find ourselves drawn to Chief Justice Roberts’s observation that “it is a sordid business, this divvying us up by race.” And along with Dr. King, we want to believe in a world where everyone is judged by the content of their character, not the color of the skin. As such, we tend to think that teachers should be hired based on the quality of their instruction and their fit with a school’s mission—not their race or ethnicity. So we’ve been skeptical, even uncomfortable, about efforts to “match” students and teachers based on their race.

Analysis and Commentary

You Might Be Surprised Which States Prioritize Higher Teacher Salaries

by Michael J. Petrillivia Education Next
Friday, April 26, 2019

It’s one of the great conundrums of American public education: Even when calculated in constant dollars, and even after the Great Recession, the U.S. is spending dramatically more per pupil than in decades past, yet teacher salaries have barely kept pace with inflation. This raises several key questions: Where is the money going, if not into salaries? And how much could we pay teachers if we prioritized higher salaries instead?

Blank Section (Placeholder)

“End of History” Lessons

by Michael J. Petrillivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The big education battles seem to have settled down, but history suggests they won’t stay settled. It’s time to consolidate gains and push the next wave of education ideas.

In the News

Teacher Raises Will Pay For Themselves

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Post Bulletin
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Democratic presidential contender Sen. Kamala Harris of California wants to increase teachers’ pay nationwide to the level enjoyed by other college-educated workers — and her proposal would give a typical educator a $13,500 raise. She suggests covering the $30-billion-a-year price tag by increasing the estate tax and closing some loopholes benefiting the top 1 percent of taxpayers.

In the News

Give Teachers More Money. The Raises Will Pay For Themselves

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Democratic presidential contender Sen. Kamala Harris of California wants to increase teachers’ pay nationwide to the level enjoyed by other college-educated workers — and her proposal would give a typical educator a $13,500 raise. She suggests covering the $30-billion-a-year price tag by increasing the estate tax and closing some loopholes benefiting the top 1% of taxpayers.

 

Pages

Hoover Education Success Initiative (HESI)

CREDO at Stanford University