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HIGHER STANDARDS FOR TEACHER TRAINING

by Eugene W. Hickokvia Policy Review
Tuesday, September 1, 1998

Eugene Hickok, Pennsylvania’s education chief, on higher standards for teacher training One man’s crusade to hold a government agency accountable to the taxpayer

Support Your Local Charter School

by Bruno V. Manno, Chester E. Finn Jr.via Policy Review
Tuesday, September 1, 1998

Civic entrepreneurs will be critical to the success of these fledgling independent public schools

Numero Uno

by Tyce Palmaffyvia Policy Review
Tuesday, September 1, 1998

El Paso superintendent Anthony Trujillo sets the standard for urban schools

Books

What's Gone Wrong in America's Classrooms

via Hoover Institution Press
Wednesday, July 15, 1998

These essays identify key failures in modern American education and illuminate some ways in which those in the teaching profession—and their students—can achieve higher levels of performance, making the case for content-rich education and explicit teaching.

State of the States

by Steven Haywardvia Policy Review
Wednesday, July 1, 1998

State of the states: taxpayers reject stadium swindles; Boston-based charter school offers a lifetime warranty; spanking in the heartland, spoiling on the coasts

Correspondence

via Policy Review
Wednesday, July 1, 1998

Death with real dignity; standards: the latest fad

Affirmative Action in Higher Education: A Dilemma of Conflicting Principles

by John H. Bunzelvia Analysis
Wednesday, July 1, 1998

As a university president in the 1970s (San Jose State) and then as a researcher and writer, Bunzel's long involvement with affirmative action in higher education has led him to conclude that the troubling issues of race and equality cannot be reduced to the easy categories of "right" versus "wrong." He objects to such moral absolutism (also reflected in California's Proposition 209) because it denies legitimacy to the inevitable complexities and nuances inherent in what he regards as a many-sided problem. Affirmative action in college admissions, he argues, must ultimately be viewed in relation to other competing principles and in light of many practical problems.

In trying to balance different claims and interests within a "theory of limits," Bunzel believes a more useful way to think about affirmative action is in terms of a "social contribution theory of universities." Thus he asks (among other questions), "Is some degree of race consciousness never defensible?" He does not think there is only one morally correct answer. Acknowledging that race has too often been considered excessively and sub rosa, he rejects both of the ideologically pure extremes--namely, that anything that overcomes the disadvantages of race is acceptable and that taking race into account is never appropriate under any circumstances.

A Nation Still at Risk

by William J. Bennett, Willard Fair, Chester E. Finn Jr., Rev. Floyd H. Flake, E. Donald Hirsch Jr., Will Marshall, Diane Ravitchvia Policy Review
Wednesday, July 1, 1998

Fifteen years after A Nation at Risk galvanized the education reform movement, little has changed.

Learn While You Earn

by John Hoodvia Policy Review
Friday, May 1, 1998

Education savings accounts offer Congress a chance to advance tax reform, help families, and counter Clintonian politics

No Strings Attached

by Jonathan Moorevia Policy Review
Friday, May 1, 1998

A private college spurns federal aid to save its academic freedom

Pages

K-12 Education Task Force

 
The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency.

CREDO at Stanford University