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Economic Policy

Financial Reconstruction: Methodical Policymaking Moves into the Spotlight

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, April 30, 2004

The Wen Jiabao administration has found its feet and instituted ambitious initiatives in the financial arena. Since December 2003, major new policies toward the financial sector have been rolled out. Recapitalization, reorganization, and stock market listing of two of the main state-owned banks have begun. A program for new policies toward the stock market has been released. The launching of major programs follows the reorganization of the administrative apparatus and the promulgation of a series of laws and programmatic documents. Thus, the resumption of activist policymaking represents the culmination of a steady and methodical process of preparation. The degree of preparation is impressive, but it also reflects the magnitude of the challenges currently being faced and the difficulty of shepherding new policies through the Chinese political system.

When Words Go Bad

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 2004

The empty vocabulary of anti-Americanism. By Hoover fellow Victor Davis Hanson.

Analysis and Commentary

Nothing New about Outsourcing

by Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, April 28, 2004

Outsourcing—the subject of intense controversy this election year—is blamed for the loss of jobs in the United States, but outsourcing should be nothing new to Americans. The founding and development of America is the result of English outsourcing in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Analysis and Commentary

The Blacks and the GOP

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Daily Report
Thursday, April 8, 2004

Each time I see the African American community preparing to vote overwhelmingly for the Democratic presidential candidate, I recall the warm Washington spring forty years ago when a craggy-faced septuagenarian named Everett McKinley Dirksen convinced his Republican senate colleagues to back cloture on the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which broke the southern Democratic filibuster and ensured passage of legislation triggering the "Second Reconstruction."

Shevardnadze's Journey

by Ariel Cohenvia Policy Review
Thursday, April 1, 2004

The Silver Fox bows out gracefully

Unipolar versus Unilateral

by John Van Oudenarenvia Policy Review
Thursday, April 1, 2004

Confusing power with purpose

Neoconservatives and the American Mainstream

by Zachary Seldenvia Policy Review
Thursday, April 1, 2004

Current U.S. foreign policy has deep historical roots

The Absolute Intellectual

by Brian C. Andersonvia Policy Review
Sunday, February 1, 2004

Brian C. Anderson on Sartre: The Philosopher of the Twentieth Century by Bernard-Henry Lévy

The Provinces

China's Northeast: From Largest Rust Belt to Fourth Economic Engine?

by Cheng Livia China Leadership Monitor
Friday, January 30, 2004

China is arguably undergoing the most challenging phase of its economic reform: revitalizing the old and stagnant industrial bases in its northeastern region. Once the "cradle of industrialization" of the People's Republic of China (PRC), the northeastern region, with a population of over 100 million, is today often called the nation's "last fortress of a planned economy." The ultimate goal of the so-called northeastern rejuvenation scheme is to transform the country's "largest rust belt" to its "fourth economic engine," after the Pearl River delta, the Yangtze River delta, and the Beijing-Tianjin corridor. This new phase of China's economic development not only will be crucial for the credibility and legitimacy of the Hu-Wen administration, but will also shape China's future. This article explores the broad political environment in which this strategic scheme has been formulated, outlines the main components of the northeastern rejuvenation, and analyzes the characteristics of top provincial leaders in the northeastern region.

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No Es Fácil

via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 30, 2004

Life is hard in Castro’s Cuba. By Mike Walker.

Pages

Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.