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Can Government Save the Family?

by William A. Galstonvia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

A symposium with Sen. John Ashcroft, David Blankenhorn, James Dobson, Gov. John Engler, William Galston, Kay James, D. James Kennedy, Rep. Steve Largent, Dan Quayle, Paul Weyrich

The Naturalizers

by John J. Millervia Policy Review
Monday, July 1, 1996

Raising the standards for American citizenship

Taxation and Economic Performance

via Analysis
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Over the past two centuries, economists have debated whether or not higher rates of taxation lead to increased levels of government revenues. In the eighteenth century, Adam Smith pointed to a reduced level of revenues from substantially higher tariffs and duties on traded goods. In the twentieth century, the Laffer Curve postulated that there would be no government revenue at a taxation level of 100 percent or 0 percent. More recently, the debate focused on the tax increases of 1990 and 1993, which were designed to reduce the federal budget deficit through an increase in government revenues. In fact, the forecasted revenue generation following each tax increase fell short of the mark.

Increases in tax rates have not raised the desired additional revenues, but they have dampened economic activity. Higher tax rates tend to reduce the tax base as taxpayers have disincentives to work, produce, save, or invest. There are, however, incentives to hide, shelter, and underreport income as tax rates are raised. Thus, the economy as a whole tends to perform less well following a tax increase. Conversely, the economy tends to perform more favorably following a reduction in tax rates. In the postwar period, government revenues as a percentage of gross domestic product have averaged 19.5 percent despite marginal income tax rates as high as 92 percent and as low as 28 percent. Despite the historic record, policy makers continue to embrace the notion that an increase in marginal tax rates will raise revenues without any attendant adverse effects on economic growth, job creation, or standard of living.

We Hold These Truths

by J.D. Hayworthvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Rep. J.D. Hayworth on powers Congress cannot delegate

Spirit of '96

by Robert Rector, Grover Norquistvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The states carry the Republican revolution forward

Profiles in Citizenship

by Matthew Spaldingvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The priest who launched the Knights of Columbus

Shelby Steele: The Content of His Character

by Shelby Steele, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele talks about his opposition to affirmative action, his upbringing, and his hopes for black Americans. An interview with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

How Little England Beat Big France

by Barry R. Weingast, Kenneth A. Schultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Authoritarian states hold an advantage over democratic ones because they can act quickly and decisively, right? Wrong. Hoover fellow Barry R. Weingast and his coauthor, Kenneth A. Schultz, argue that every time an authoritarian state and a liberal state get into a protracted fight, the liberal state wins. Here Weingast and Schultz examine the century and a quarter of conflict between England and France during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Five Months that Shook Russia

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

From October 1994 to February 1995, Russian militants--the "party of war"--sought to block free-market reforms and to reestablish an imperial foreign policy. They almost got away with it. Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop tells the story.

Rose and Milton Friedman: Our Early Years

by Milton Friedman, Rose D. Friedman, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

"If you don't want to be forgotten," Benjamin Franklin wrote in Poor Richard's Almanac, "do something worth the writing, or write something worth the reading." Rose and Milton Friedman decided to do both, leading extraordinary lives, then composing their memoirs, on which they are now working. Here they pause from the hard labor of writing to talk with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson about their early years.

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.