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Books

The Wealth of Nations in the Twentieth Century: The Policies and Institutional Determinants of Economic Development

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, November 26, 1996

This collection of essays, based on a conference at the Hoover Institution, compares the governmental policies and institutional determinants of economic development for sixteen countries within the context of Western economic development and national trends in the world economy. The study also includes an essay by Amartya Sen that examines the meaning of wealth and its different measurements.

Books

Impostors in the Temple: A Blueprint for Improving Higher Education in America

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Institution Press
Friday, September 6, 1996

In this hard-hitting book about the decaying moral and intellectual state of U.S. universities and colleges today, Anderson shows us how serious things have become. More important, it offers us dramatic solutions about what we can do about improving our higher education.

AmeriCorps the Beautiful?

by Harris Wofford, Steven Waldman, Doug Bandowvia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

Should conservatives support Clinton's national-service programs?

Can Government Save the Family?

by William A. Galstonvia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

A symposium with Sen. John Ashcroft, David Blankenhorn, James Dobson, Gov. John Engler, William Galston, Kay James, D. James Kennedy, Rep. Steve Largent, Dan Quayle, Paul Weyrich

The Naturalizers

by John J. Millervia Policy Review
Monday, July 1, 1996

Raising the standards for American citizenship

Taxation and Economic Performance

via Analysis
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Over the past two centuries, economists have debated whether or not higher rates of taxation lead to increased levels of government revenues. In the eighteenth century, Adam Smith pointed to a reduced level of revenues from substantially higher tariffs and duties on traded goods. In the twentieth century, the Laffer Curve postulated that there would be no government revenue at a taxation level of 100 percent or 0 percent. More recently, the debate focused on the tax increases of 1990 and 1993, which were designed to reduce the federal budget deficit through an increase in government revenues. In fact, the forecasted revenue generation following each tax increase fell short of the mark.

Increases in tax rates have not raised the desired additional revenues, but they have dampened economic activity. Higher tax rates tend to reduce the tax base as taxpayers have disincentives to work, produce, save, or invest. There are, however, incentives to hide, shelter, and underreport income as tax rates are raised. Thus, the economy as a whole tends to perform less well following a tax increase. Conversely, the economy tends to perform more favorably following a reduction in tax rates. In the postwar period, government revenues as a percentage of gross domestic product have averaged 19.5 percent despite marginal income tax rates as high as 92 percent and as low as 28 percent. Despite the historic record, policy makers continue to embrace the notion that an increase in marginal tax rates will raise revenues without any attendant adverse effects on economic growth, job creation, or standard of living.

We Hold These Truths

by J.D. Hayworthvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Rep. J.D. Hayworth on powers Congress cannot delegate

Spirit of '96

by Robert Rector, Grover Norquistvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The states carry the Republican revolution forward

Profiles in Citizenship

by Matthew Spaldingvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The priest who launched the Knights of Columbus

Pages

Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.