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One Page of Pure Hook

by Sidney Hookvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

A letter from the late Sidney Hook to the editor of Stanford University's Campus Report, reproduced from the Sidney Hook papers in the Hoover Institution Archives. A lovely dollop of logic.

Is the Third Wave Receding?

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The rapid emergence of new democracies during the past two decades is often termed the third wave of democratization. (The first wave took place from the 1820s to the 1920s, the second, from the 1940s to the early 1960s.) Hoover fellow Larry Diamond argues that the third wave is substantially over-and that we must act now to prevent a reverse wave from sweeping the weaker democracies away.

Stalin: The Revised Edition

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

A recent book entitled Life and Terror in Stalin's Russia argues that "Stalin was not guilty of mass first-degree murder from 1934 to 1941." Hoover fellow Robert Conquest examines this argument, engaging in a serene demolition.

The Intellect as a Weapon For Freedom

by John H. Bunzelvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The philosopher and Hoover fellow Sidney Hook (1902-1989) fought a tenacious battle against the politicization of the university. An appreciation by Hoover fellow John H. Bunzel.

North Korea at a Crossroads

via Analysis
Wednesday, January 1, 1997

North Korea remains a country difficult for outsiders to analyze, given the paucity of hard data. Yet certain facts have been established. The economy is in crisis, a product not only of the Russian demise and the recent floods but of the inadequacies of a Stalinist economic strategy: autarky, imbalance, and overbureaucratization. A growing number of the elite now recognize these facts, and the momentum for reform is rising despite perceived political hazards. Whether it will be in time to prevent collapse is debated by outside observers.

Politically, the effort is to maintain the existing order by reproducing Kim Il Sung in his son, Kim Jong Il. Young Kim is cultivating the military assiduously and carefully replacing his father's guerrilla generation with individuals closer to his age, some of them relatives. There are no signs of cleavage at this point, but the decision-making structure remains difficult to discern. The goal, however, is clear: total unity under the leader and party.

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea's (DPRK's) foreign policy is rational from the North's perspective: achieve diplomatic relations with the United States and Japan while relegating the Republic of Korea (ROK) to the sidelines. Yet improvements in North-South relations will be essential if the broader goal is to be reached. Meanwhile, relations with China are relatively satisfactory but lack the old warmth, and those with Russia are still tepid not- withstanding Moscow's efforts.

Despite the uncertainties surrounding the DPRK's future, the interests of others, including the ROK and the United States, lie in seeing this state undergo an evolutionary process rather than a collapse. Thus policies should be directed toward that end, acknowledging that the outcome will depend heavily on North Korean leaders and their decisions.

The Liberal Rout: Why Conservatives Are Winning in the 1990s

by John Englervia Policy Review
Wednesday, January 1, 1997

Despite Clinton's victory, conservatives are winning -- state by state by state.

Books

The Wealth of Nations in the Twentieth Century: The Policies and Institutional Determinants of Economic Development

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, November 26, 1996

This collection of essays, based on a conference at the Hoover Institution, compares the governmental policies and institutional determinants of economic development for sixteen countries within the context of Western economic development and national trends in the world economy. The study also includes an essay by Amartya Sen that examines the meaning of wealth and its different measurements.

Books

Impostors in the Temple: A Blueprint for Improving Higher Education in America

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Institution Press
Friday, September 6, 1996

In this hard-hitting book about the decaying moral and intellectual state of U.S. universities and colleges today, Anderson shows us how serious things have become. More important, it offers us dramatic solutions about what we can do about improving our higher education.

Can Government Save the Family?

by William A. Galstonvia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

A symposium with Sen. John Ashcroft, David Blankenhorn, James Dobson, Gov. John Engler, William Galston, Kay James, D. James Kennedy, Rep. Steve Largent, Dan Quayle, Paul Weyrich

Pages

Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.