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We Hold These Truths

by J.D. Hayworthvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Rep. J.D. Hayworth on powers Congress cannot delegate

Profiles in Citizenship

by Matthew Spaldingvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The priest who launched the Knights of Columbus

Spirit of '96

by Robert Rector, Grover Norquistvia Policy Review
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

The states carry the Republican revolution forward

Taxation and Economic Performance

via Analysis
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

Over the past two centuries, economists have debated whether or not higher rates of taxation lead to increased levels of government revenues. In the eighteenth century, Adam Smith pointed to a reduced level of revenues from substantially higher tariffs and duties on traded goods. In the twentieth century, the Laffer Curve postulated that there would be no government revenue at a taxation level of 100 percent or 0 percent. More recently, the debate focused on the tax increases of 1990 and 1993, which were designed to reduce the federal budget deficit through an increase in government revenues. In fact, the forecasted revenue generation following each tax increase fell short of the mark.

Increases in tax rates have not raised the desired additional revenues, but they have dampened economic activity. Higher tax rates tend to reduce the tax base as taxpayers have disincentives to work, produce, save, or invest. There are, however, incentives to hide, shelter, and underreport income as tax rates are raised. Thus, the economy as a whole tends to perform less well following a tax increase. Conversely, the economy tends to perform more favorably following a reduction in tax rates. In the postwar period, government revenues as a percentage of gross domestic product have averaged 19.5 percent despite marginal income tax rates as high as 92 percent and as low as 28 percent. Despite the historic record, policy makers continue to embrace the notion that an increase in marginal tax rates will raise revenues without any attendant adverse effects on economic growth, job creation, or standard of living.

I Voted for Bobby Kennedy

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

In this wry account, Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro describes his journey from modern liberal to classical liberal. The confessions of a free-market economist

The NonThreat of North Korea

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

North Korea represents one of the last Stalinist nations on earth--a powerful military, a poor populace, and rulers who can appear deranged. Will North Korea attack South Korea, as it did in 1950? Relax, says Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers.

Is Democracy Good for Growth?

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

It sounds nice to try to install democracy in places like Haiti and Somalia, but does it make any sense? Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro has his doubts.

Eyewitness to a Cataclysm

by Terence Emmons, Bertrand M. Patenaude, Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Frank Golder--professor of Russian history and the first curator of the Hoover War Collection--founded the extraordinary Slavic collection now housed in the Hoover archives. Golder visited Russia repeatedly during the first three decades of the century, witnessing Russia's entry into the Great War, the Revolution, the early workings of Lenin's government, and the changes in Soviet society after Lenin's death. Herewith excerpts from Golder's historic diary and letters, selected by Acting Archivist Elena S. Danielson.

Nobody Here But Us Liberals

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Think America is a conservative country? Think again. Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset explains that there are no true conservatives here--or, for that matter, any true socialists either--just different shades of classical liberals.

Shelby Steele: The Content of His Character

by Shelby Steele, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele talks about his opposition to affirmative action, his upbringing, and his hopes for black Americans. An interview with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.