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Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Pacific Century: Professor Rana Mitter on the Tiananmen Square Massacre and the May Fourth Movement

interview with Rana Mitter, Michael R. Auslin, John Yoovia The Pacific Century
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Professor Mitter discusses the Tiananmen Square Massacre thirty years later and the 100th Anniversary of the May Fourth Movement as well as and the future of Chinese pluralism after the coming to power of Xi Jinping.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Pacific Century: Professor Rana Mitter On The Tiananmen Square Massacre And The May Fourth Movement

interview with Rana Mitter, Michael R. Auslin, John Yoovia The Pacific Century
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Professor Mitter discusses the Tiananmen Square Massacre thirty years later and the 100th Anniversary of the May Fourth Movement as well as and the future of Chinese pluralism after the coming to power of Xi Jinping.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: Trump, Trade, And China

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Are tariffs a necessary evil when it comes to stopping Chinese predation?

Featured

The Global Crisis Of Democracy

by Larry Diamondvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, May 17, 2019

There is nothing inevitable about the expansion of democracy. Among countries with populations above one million, there were only 11 democracies in 1900, 20 in 1920 and 29 in 1974. Only for the past quarter of a century has democracy been the world’s predominant form of government. By 1993, the number of democracies had exploded to 77—representing, for the first time in history, a majority of countries with at least one million people. By 2006, the number of democracies had ticked up to 86.

In the News

Did China Break The World Economic Order?

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia The New York Times
Friday, May 17, 2019

Last Friday, the White House raised the tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports up to 25 percent. On Monday, China retaliated with tariffs of its own. The trade war is now full-on — except that it’s not really about trade.

In the News

Trump’s New Chokehold On Huawei Threatens The Telecom Firm And U.S.-China Trade Talks

quoting Elizabeth Economyvia The Los Angeles Times
Thursday, May 16, 2019

When the Trump administration blocked U.S. firms last year from providing critical parts to ZTE Corp., it quickly paralyzed the Chinese telecom company and threatened to force it into bankruptcy — until President Trump issued a last-minute reprieve as a favor to Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Interviews

Michael Auslin: "Promise Fatigue" With The False Promises Of The PRC

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, May 16, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses his RealClear Politics article "Trump Has 'Promise Fatigue' From Dealing With China."

The Classicist with Victor Davis Hanson:
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Classicist: Understanding Chinese Strategy

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Classicist
Thursday, May 16, 2019

A deep analysis of how Beijing is asserting itself on the world stage.

Analysis and Commentary

Did Huawei’s Chairman Just Admit That Huawei Spies?

by Michael R. Auslinvia National Review
Tuesday, May 14, 2019
According to Reuters, Huawei’s chairman offered to make “no-spy” agreements with Western governments to be allowed to participate in building 5G networks. Is the offer an implicit acknowledgment that Huawei does indeed spy on its customers, or that it has the capability to?
Featured

China’s Brilliant, Insidious Strategy

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The Chinese Communist government does not have so much a strategy to translate its economic ascendance into global hegemony as several strategies. All of them are brilliantly insidious.

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