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In the News

Fed's Dot Plot, QE, Average Inflation: Fed Conference Takeaways

quoting John B. Taylorvia Bloomberg
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

The Federal Reserve wound up its two-day framework conference on Wednesday with little consensus on what can be done to better prepare for the next big recession.

Interviews

Secretary George Shultz: Thinking About the Future

interview with George P. Shultzvia Commonwealth Club
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow George Shultz discusses his newest book, Thinking About the Future.

Why Cities Lose: The Deep Roots of the Urban-Rural Political Divide

by Jonathan Roddenvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Why is it so much easier for the Democratic Party to win the national popular vote than to build and maintain a majority in Congress? Why can Democrats sweep statewide offices in places like Pennsylvania and Michigan yet fail to take control of the same states' legislatures? Many place exclusive blame on partisan gerrymandering and voter suppression. But as political scientist Jonathan A. Rodden demonstrates in Why Cities Lose, the left's electoral challenges have deeper roots in economic and political geography.

In the News

‘Swinging At Every Pitch’: California’s Governor Has Big Plans. Critics See Big Risks.

quoting Bill Whalenvia The New York Times
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Amid the swirl of big name presidential candidates who descended on San Francisco recently for the Democratic Party’s state convention, Gov. Gavin Newsom made sure there was a place in the spotlight for him.

In the News

How America’s Urban-Rural Divide Shapes Elections

featuring Jonathan Roddenvia The Economist
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

IN NINE OF America’s 13 congressional elections between 1994 and 2018, the Republican Party won a greater share of seats than votes. In 2012, Democrats failed to garner a majority of seats while winning a broad popular vote victory. Even in the 2018 mid-terms, which were described as a “wave” election, The Economist predicted that the Democrats had to win the popular vote in the House of Representatives by 5-6 percentage points to obtain a bare majority of seats. In the Senate, the situation is worse because of the way states magnify the pro-rural bias of America’s electoral institutions.

Interviews

Russ Roberts On Life As An Economics Educator

interview with Russell Robertsvia Medium
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Russ Roberts examines where classical liberalism has gone wrong, if dropping out of college is overrated, and what people are missing from the Bible.

Interviews

Bill Whalen On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses presidential candidate Joe Biden's comments concerning impeachment.

Interviews

Bill Whalen On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses the California Democratic Party Convention in San Francisco, as well as the policies that were booed, the candidates who did well, and who wasn't there.

In the News

Why Barr Is Hell-Bent On Emboldening An Authoritarian Presidency

quoting John Yoovia Rantt Media
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

The modern conservative theory of the unitary executive is corrupting our system of government. It’s the theory that Article II of the Constitution renders the President an all-powerful figure. The theory can be summed up in President Richard Nixon’s infamous words: “Well, when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal.” This is a notion the Trump administration is embracing in the aftermath of President Trump’s unprecedented obstruction of the Russia probe and his tactic of stonewalling Congress.

Featured

Jonathan Rodden: The Consequences Of America’s Urban-Rural Political Divide

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia WAMU 88.5
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden discusses the political divisions within the United States. One of the starkest is the fault line that runs between the rural and urban regions of the country, and the history of this geographical split as well as the profound consequences it has had for politics in the US. His recent book goes into further detail about this divide, Why Cities Lose: The Deep Roots of the Urban-Rural Political Divide.

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