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John McCain, Call Your Office

by Tod Lindbergvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, July 30, 2002

Why McCain-Feingold won’t work. By Hoover fellow Tod Lindberg.

Simon Says

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, July 30, 2002

If Bill Simon wants to win the California governor’s race this November, he can start by reading this. By Hoover fellow Bill Whalen.

WINDS OF CHANGE: Politics After Sept. 11

with Newt Gingrich, Nelson W. Polsbyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, July 18, 2002

The war on terrorism has created unique ideological challenges for both ends of the American political spectrum. Does the left, long opposed to the exercise of U.S. military power, risk irrelevance by opposing the war on terror? How does the libertarian wing of the right, long opposed to big government, respond to its expanding role in protecting our security? How has President Bush's conduct of the war on terrorism affected his chances for reelection in 2004?

ATTENTION: DEFICIT DISORDER: The Budget Deficit

with Alan Auerbach, Stephen Moorevia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, June 27, 2002

Just two years ago, in the 2000 fiscal year, the annual federal budget had a surplus of $236 billion. Now the federal government is facing a budget deficit of more than $150 billion, possibly much more. And whereas during the presidential campaign of 2000, the candidates were debating how to spend trillions in expected future surpluses, the Congressional Budget Office is now projecting a cumulative $1 trillion deficit by 2011. What happened to the surplus, and what is to blame for the return of the deficit? Is it President Bush's tax cut? Or was it the recession of 2001 and the war on terrorism? In light of the deficit, what should we make of the president's budget plans?

PROGNOSIS NEGATIVE: Health Care System in Crisis

with Alan M. Garber, M.D., George Halvorson, Helen H. Schaufflervia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 14, 2002

Ten years ago, soaring health care costs prompted the Clinton administration to propose sweeping reforms to the health care system, including a substantial new role for the federal government. But the plan drafted under the guidance of First Lady Hillary Clinton was defeated in Congress. A decade later, the problems with our health care system seem to have only gotten worse. In the recent economic downturn, millions lost their insurance along with their jobs, adding to the estimated 40 to 45 million Americans who have no medical insurance at all. Meanwhile the costs incurred by government and businesses to keep the rest of us covered are skyrocketing. Has the HMO model of health care that became predominant in the 1990s failed us? If so, what should replace it?

Analysis and Commentary

Philadelphia Freedom

by John E. Chubbvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, June 3, 2002

No city has come close to Philadelphia in "freeing up" the supply of public schools.

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Getting Standards Right

by Paul T. Hillvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 2002

Why state education standards are too often ineffective. By Hoover fellow Paul T. Hill.

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On School Reform, Let’s Stay the Course

by Diane Ravitchvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 2002

Recent reforms in Massachusetts show how we can improve our public schools by demanding excellence–from students and teachers alike. By Hoover fellow Diane Ravitch.

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Federalize Vaccine Production? We’d Be Taking a Shot in the Dark

by Henry I. Miller, Sam Kazmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 2002

Since the anthrax scare last fall, there have been calls for the federal government to set up a National Vaccine Authority. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller and Sam Kazman explain why that would be a mistake—with deadly consequences.

School Accountability: An Assessment by the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education

School Accountability: An Assessment by the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education

by Herbert J. Walberg, Williamson M. Eversvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Thursday, April 25, 2002

A group of expert authors from a wide range of perspectives reveal what is known about accountability, what still needs to be learned, what should be done right now, and what should be avoided in devising accountability systems.

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Research Teams