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DEBT AND TAXES: The Bush Administration's Tax Plan

with Michael J. Boskin, Robert Reichvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, January 30, 2003

In January 2003, the Bush administration unveiled a package of proposed new tax cuts, including provisions to eliminate the taxation of dividends and make permanent the 2001 tax cut. President Bush called the plan "an immediate boost to the economy" as well as "essential for the long run to lay the groundwork for future growth and prosperity." Critics have said that the plan doesn't provide short-term economic stimulus and endangers long-term growth and prosperity. Is the Bush tax plan good for the economy or not?

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Beating the Odds

by David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

With the slow economy and a slew of corporate scandals making headlines, the Democrats should have swept last fall’s midterm elections. What happened? An analysis by Hoover fellows David W. Brady and Morris P. Fiorina.

THINKING GREEN OR THINKING GREENBACKS: President Bush's Environmental Policy

with Terry Anderson, Mark Hertsgaardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, January 30, 2003

During the 2000 presidential campaign, George W. Bush said, "Prosperity will mean little if we leave future generations a world of polluted air, toxic lakes and rivers and vanished forests." So after two years in office, how has President Bush done as the chief steward of our nation's air, water, and land? Is the Bush environmental record the disaster that critics contend? Or has the administration just done a poor job of articulating its vision for new ways of caring for the environment?

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America Lays It on the Line

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

The Bush Doctrine could transform international relations for generations to come. By Hoover fellow Charles Hill.

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A Man for All Seasons

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

Introducing a new, more flexible George W. Bush. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

Why Big Government Is Still the Problem

by Dinesh D’Souzavia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 2003

Is the era of big government really over? In a word, hardly. By Hoover fellow Dinesh D’Souza.

THE EMPIRE STRIKES FIRST? The National Security Strategy of the United States

with Eliot Cohen, Peter Tarnoffvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, January 16, 2003

In September 2002, President Bush released the first National Security Strategy report of his administration. Crafted by the president, his national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice, and a team of experts both inside and outside government, the report lays out what some have called "the most important reformulation of U.S. grand strategy in more than half a century." Proponents say that the National Security Strategy presents the case for the responsible and justified use of American power, but critics call it a dangerous "doctrine without limits." Who's right?

Analysis and Commentary

The 2002 Elections: Much Sound, Little Fury

by David Brady, Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, December 30, 2002

What the switch in control will change is the "show time" aspects of the Senate process.

Analysis and Commentary

Leaving Many Children Behind

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Daily Report
Monday, December 9, 2002

This halfhearted choice provision was supposed to take immediate effect for pupils in more than 8,000 schools that have already lingered for two years or more on their states' lists of education failures.

REAGAN'S WAR: Who Won the Cold War

with Michael McFaul, Peter Schweizer, Barton Bernsteinvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, November 11, 2002

Did Ronald Reagan win the cold war? It's been a dozen years since its end—time enough to look back on the era with some historical perspective. And one question that historians continue to argue about is the role that Ronald Reagan, the man and his policies, played in bringing the cold war to an end. To what extent did Reagan's cold war strategy build on efforts of previous administrations and to what extent was it new? Did the Soviet Union collapse as a result of external pressure or internal weakness?

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