Filter By:

Subtopic

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

An Outside-the-Box Economist

by Claire Menckevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Nobel Prize–winner and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker has spent a career applying the discipline of economics to noneconomic problems, such as drug addiction and family formation. A glimpse of one of the profession's most intriguing thinkers. By Claire Mencke.

The Case for Colorblind Justice

by Terry Eastlandvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Affirmative action was supposed to be a temporary measure limited to blacks. It was soon made permanent and extended to Hispanics, women, and others. Editor in Chief of Forbes MediaCritic magazine and former Hoover media fellow Terry Eastland argues for ending affirmative action once and for all.

The Economics of Ideas

by Kevin Kellyvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Only forty, Hoover fellow Paul M. Romer has already stood a great deal of economic theory on its head. A profile of Romer and his work. By Kevin Kelly.

The NonThreat of North Korea

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

North Korea represents one of the last Stalinist nations on earth--a powerful military, a poor populace, and rulers who can appear deranged. Will North Korea attack South Korea, as it did in 1950? Relax, says Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers.

I Voted for Bobby Kennedy

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

In this wry account, Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro describes his journey from modern liberal to classical liberal. The confessions of a free-market economist

Is Democracy Good for Growth?

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

It sounds nice to try to install democracy in places like Haiti and Somalia, but does it make any sense? Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro has his doubts.

Nobody Here But Us Liberals

by Seymour Martin Lipsetvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Think America is a conservative country? Think again. Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset explains that there are no true conservatives here--or, for that matter, any true socialists either--just different shades of classical liberals.

Eyewitness to a Cataclysm

by Terence Emmons, Bertrand M. Patenaude, Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Frank Golder--professor of Russian history and the first curator of the Hoover War Collection--founded the extraordinary Slavic collection now housed in the Hoover archives. Golder visited Russia repeatedly during the first three decades of the century, witnessing Russia's entry into the Great War, the Revolution, the early workings of Lenin's government, and the changes in Soviet society after Lenin's death. Herewith excerpts from Golder's historic diary and letters, selected by Acting Archivist Elena S. Danielson.

Shelby Steele: The Content of His Character

by Shelby Steele, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele talks about his opposition to affirmative action, his upbringing, and his hopes for black Americans. An interview with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

The Democratic Advantage: The Institutional Sources of State Power in International Competition

by Barry R. Weingastvia Analysis
Friday, March 1, 1996

According to the standard wisdom in international relations, authoritarian states hold an advantage over democratic states because they can act more quickly and decisively. Yet over the last several centuries, every extended rivalry between an authoritarian state and a liberal one has been won by the liberal state: the Dutch revolt against Spain (late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries); the 125-year rivalry between England and France (1689-1815); the Anglo-French-American rivalry with Germany (late nineteenth through mid-twentieth century); and the American/Allied rivalry with the Soviet Union after World War II.

This paper shows why liberal democracies have a long-term advantage in international competition with authoritarian states. We argue that this reflects the greater ability of liberal states to establish credible limited government. This ability has both long-term advantages for growth and substantial short-term financial advantages during periods of intense international conflict. The financial advantages allow a liberal democracy to raise massive funds through debt, thus financing larger and longer wars. After developing the theoretical perspective, we study two cases, the 125-year rivalry between England and France and the more recent cold war between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Pages

Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.