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Analysis and Commentary

An Analysis Of Admissions In Elite Universities And Colleges For The Class Of 2023

by Alvin Rabushkavia Thoughtful Ideas
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

In the past two decades, almost every elite university and liberal arts college has reduced White admissions from a majority to a steadily decreasing minority of its undergraduate students. They boast of this achievement on their web sites and in their admission brochures. In 2019, the share of White admissions to elite schools ranges from 21% to 36% less than Whites as a share of the U.S. population. One can plot the reduction in White admissions over the past 20 years from the published numbers in their Common Data Sets.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Occupational Licensing Is A Bad Idea

by David R. Hendersonvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, April 2, 2019

People have a right to make a living. 

No Change in Student Achievement Gap in Last 50 Years

interview with Eric Hanushekvia Hoover Institution
Monday, April 1, 2019

After more than fifty years of educational policies aimed at closing student achievement gaps, a large divide continues to exist between those at the top and lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder, according to new research by Hoover scholars.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Fixing The Culture Of Contempt

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, April 1, 2019

In a new book, Love Your Enemies, Arthur Brooks describes the rise of a “culture of contempt”—a habit of seeing people who disagree with us not as merely incorrect or misguided, but as worthless--and considers what we can do to bridge divides and mend relationships.

Featured

No Change In Student Achievement Gap In Last 50 Years

Monday, April 1, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

After more than fifty years of educational policies aimed at closing student achievement gaps, a large divide continues to exist between those at the top and lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder, according to new research by Hoover scholars.

News
Black students in a classroom
Analysis and Commentary

Discriminating By Race

by John Yoovia City-Journal
Friday, March 29, 2019

New York City has a serious problem with its schools. It’s not the high failure rates, low test scores, or deteriorating buildings. Instead, mayor Bill de Blasio and chancellor of education Richard Carranza believe, it’s that the best city schools—the specialized or magnet high schools—have too many students of the wrong race and too few of the right ones. Stuyvesant High School, widely considered the city’s most selective public high school, this month offered just seven seats out of 895 to black students. 

Featured

Can The Federal Government Rescue Campus Free Speech?

by Peter Berkowitzvia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, March 31, 2019

The well-documented inability of American colleges and universities to reverse the several-decades-long curtailment of free speech on campus is a matter of considerable public interest. Whether the federal government is capable of producing effective reform is another question. President Trump seems to believe Washington is up to the task.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli On The Education Gadfly Show: Are Schools Ready For An Economic Downturn?

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli talks about reminding schools to prepare for a rainy day, which is likely coming soon.

Analysis and Commentary

Five Lessons From My Time On The Maryland State Board Of Education

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, March 27, 2019

A surprising array of events are arranged in four-year cycles: leap years, the Olympics, presidential elections, and many “terms of office,” including those on the Maryland State Board of Education, where I just concluded my tour of duty.

Analysis and Commentary

A Moonshot For Kids

by Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Spring may be coming, but our “policy winter” continues. That’s my forecast, anyway, as today’s crazy politics combined with leftover fatigue from the Bush-Obama era has led most of the nation’s leaders to shy away from anything that looks or sounds like a big new move to reform K–12 education, outside showering our broken system with lots more money.

Pages

K-12 Education Task Force

 
The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency.

CREDO at Stanford University