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In the News

Moonshot Competition Seeks Ideas To Revolutionize Education

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia The Journal
Thursday, July 18, 2019
Two organizations, one liberal and the other conservative, have announced a joint project to seek new ideas that will "revolutionize schooling." The deadline for applications is August 1, 2019.
Featured

One Small Step For Man, One Giant Leap For Our Schools?

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Michael J. Petrillivia The Education Gadfly Show Podcast
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
Hoover Institution fellows Checker Finn and Michael Petrilli discuss how the moon landing relates to American education.
Featured

Gifted Education Faces “Clear And Present” Problems

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via EducationNext
Thursday, July 18, 2019

The Institute for Educational Advancement recently completed an elaborate survey of public views toward many aspects of the education of gifted children and the results are enlightening, sobering—and complicated. Authored by Institute president Betsy Jones and Institute fellow Shelagh Gallagher, the report is aimed partly at advocates within the field of gifted-and-talented education, as a substantial portion of it is devoted to “market testing” various terms and phrases to determine which resonate best with which audiences and constituencies as well as the type of “messaging” that seems most effective in building public support for programs of this sort. (The rather surprising winner: “Money for prisons, not for gifted.”)

Analysis and Commentary

A Rising Economic Tide + Reform + Resources = Better Results For Kids

by Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Last week I argued that much of the progress of the NCLB era may have stemmed from the dramatically declining child poverty rates of the 1990s.

In the News

Fatalism Should Have No Place In Education

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Foundation for Economic Education
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Teaching kids that life is unfair is necessary, but so, too, is teaching them that their skin color or cultural background does not predestine their fate in this life.

Analysis and Commentary

The Federal Charter Schools Program: A Short, Opinionated History, Part I

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

With four billion dollars of funding over twenty-five years, the federal Charter Schools Program (CSP) has turned out to be one of the larger and (in my view) more successful examples of government-supported R & D in the K–12 realm, with heavy emphasis on the “D,” but in ways that have also fostered considerable innovation. It has, in the words of veteran education analyst Christy Wolfe (now at the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools), “played a critical role in increasing the number of charter schools across the country.”

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New Issue Of Hoover Digest Online

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

The summer issue of Hoover Digest is now available online. The journal focuses on topics both classical—the economy, personal freedom, the role of government—and timely, such as cybersecurity, terrorism, and geopolitical shifts. 

Analysis and Commentary

Perhaps Progress Against Poverty Helped Test Scores Rise

by Michael J. Petrillivia Education Next
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

This is the fourth in a series of posts looking at whether the nation’s schools have improved over the past quarter-century or so—what might be considered the modern “reform era” of American education. The first two posts demonstrated that student outcomes rose significantly from the mid-1990s until the Great Recession —especially in reading and math, but in other academic subjects, too. 

In the News

The World’s Top 50 Thinkers 2019

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Prospect
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Prospect salutes the scientists, philosophers and writers reshaping our times—and asks for your help choosing our 2019 winners. Never doubt that thoughtful minds can change the world; they are the only things that ever do. Margaret Mead is thought to have said something like that, which chimes with Keynes, who wrote that the self-styled practical men running the world were unwittingly guided by forgotten academic scribblers. For Victor Hugo, meanwhile, the one thing stronger than all the armies in the world was “an idea whose time had come.”

In the News

Study: Maryland Charter Students’ Gains Outpace Those At Traditional Schools; Black, Hispanic Pupils Benefit Most

quoting Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia The Baltimore Sun
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

A new study has found that students at Maryland charter schools, especially those who are black or Hispanic, have on average made greater academic progress than their counterparts in traditional public schools. While the study noted deficiencies in about a third of charter schools, the student gains were the equivalent of them getting about an extra month of learning over the typical 180-day school year, according to Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes, or CREDO.

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K-12 Education Task Force

 
The K–12 Education Task Force focuses on education policy as it relates to government provision and oversight versus private solutions (both within and outside the public school system) that stress choice, accountability, and transparency.

CREDO at Stanford University