Hoover Hosts "Hunger Draws the Map" Conference

Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Historian Hew Strachan in conversation with Hoover staff members. Strachan delivered the keynote address for the 2017 "Hunger Draws the Map" conference.

Above: Historian Hew Strachan in conversation with Hoover staff members. Strachan delivered the keynote address for the 2017 "Hunger Draws the Map" conference.

This month the  Hoover Institution hosted the 2nd annual workshop of the Leverhulme-Trust funded project "Hunger Draws the Map! Blockade and Food Shortages In Europe, 1914-1922" which is based at the University of Oxford. Members of the network are working together to research the impact of food shortages on European and Ottoman societies during the First World War. The project considers both the causes and the consequences of reduced food supplies. The group compares levels of hunger and responses to it during and immediately after the War, and the way this shaped societies. Some of the main themes examined and discussed included political responses to hunger, social repercussions of hunger, cultural perspectives of hunger, food as an international issue, and physical effects of deprivation. The overall project will result in an edited volume structured around thematic chapters.

In addition to discussions and meetings, members of the Hunger Draws the Map network spent an additional week doing research in the Hoover Archives and Library. They greatly benefitted from the wealth of the collections that Hoover holds related to hunger and living standards during the early 20th century, as well as from the expertise of the archivists and librarians.

The Hoover Institution is a formal partner with Oxford University in the Hunger Draws the Map Network. This is the second of three annual workshops, the first of which was held at Oxford last year.

 

Participants include:

Mustafa Aksakal (Georgetown University)

Mary Cox (University of Oxford and Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution)

Joel Floris (University of Zurich)

Friederike Kind-Kovács (University of Regensburg)

Samuël Kruizinga (University of Amsterdam)

Claire Morelon (University of Oxford)

Nick Siekierski (The Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History at the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland)

Eriks Jekabsons (University of Latvia)

Bertrand Patenaude (Hoover Institution)

Sir Hew Strachan (University of St Andrews)

John Horne (Trinity College, Dublin)