Fellows
Fellows
national medal of science
nobel prize
national humanities medal
presidential medal of freedom
american academy of arts and sciences
Sidney D. Drell
Sidney D. Drell
senior fellow
member of the task force on energy policy

Expertise: Theoretical physics, national security, arms control

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Recent Commentary

Op-ed archive

Links

Drell papers in the Hoover Archives

Awards and Honors

American Academy of Arts and Sciences

American Philosophical Society

Enrico Fermi Award (2000)

Heinz Award (2005)

MacArthur Fellows (1984)

NNSA Administrator's Gold Medal of Excellence (2012)

National Academy of Sciences

National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal (2001)

National Medal of Science (2011)

Reykjavik Award (2012)

Related Publications

Realizing the Full Potential of the Open Skies Treaty

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise

The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons

Sidney D. Drell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a professor of theoretical physics emeritus at Stanford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, where he served as deputy director until retiring in 1998. An arms control specialist, he has advised the executive and legislative branches of government on national security and technical defense issues for more than four decades. From 1983 to 1989, he was the founding codirector of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Arms Control.

Drell also served as a member of the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board and the President’s Science Advisory Committee. He chaired the Panel on Nuclear Weapons Safety of the House Armed Services Committee, the Technology Review Panel of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Senior Review Board of the Intelligence Community’s Technology Innovation Center.

In 2006 Drell, together with former secretary of state George P. Shultz, initiated a program at the Hoover Institution that would initiate steps toward a world free of nuclear weapons. Their latest coedited publication is The Nuclear Enterprise: High-Consequence Accidents: How to Enhance Safety and Minimize Risks in Nuclear Weapons and Reactors (Hoover Institution Press, 2012).

In recognition of his achievements, Drell has received numerous awards, including the National Medal of Science (2011); the Enrico Fermi Award, the nation's oldest award in science and technology; a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation; the Heinz Award for contributions in public policy; the Rumford Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ and the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal. Drell was one of ten scientists honored as “founders of national reconnaissance as a space discipline” by the US National Reconnaissance Office. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society and was president of the American Physical Society in 1986.

Drell received his AB from Princeton University, his PhD from the University of Illinois in physics, and honorary degrees from the University of Illinois, the Weizmann Institute of Science, and the University of Tel Aviv.

His research papers are available at the Hoover Institution Archives.

Last updated on July 3, 2013