Strategika

Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Issue 23

Will NATO survive as a credible alliance - and should it?
Background Essay
Background Essay

Whither NATO?

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Formed in 1949 in response to the onset of the Cold War, the purpose of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, according to British General Hastings Lionel Ismay, the first Secretary General of the alliance, was “to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.” Sixty-five years after the creation of NATO, little it seems has changed with the exception...

Podcast: Strategika – “NATO: The Once And Future Alliance” With Peter Mansoor
Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Europe To The World: “Count Me Out!”

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

World Order, Henry Kissinger muses in his eponymous book, requires somebody—a state or an institution—to maintain it. He holds up the Westphalian System, put in place after the murderous Thirty Years’ War, as one institutional pillar. As another instance, he cites the Congress of Vienna (1815), which spawned the Quadruple as well as the Holy Alliance.

Podcast: Strategika – “Will the West Still Fight?” With Josef Joffe
Featured Commentary

A Refashioned NATO

by Ken Jowittvia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

NATO’s character and mission were clearly delineated at its inception. Its mission was to countervail Soviet military power, specifically an attack on Western Europe. The fixed focus was the Fulda Gap.

E.g., 6 / 29 / 2015
E.g., 6 / 29 / 2015
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Issue 23

Will NATO survive as a credible alliance - and should it?

Background Essay

by Peter R. Mansoor Tuesday, May 12, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Josef Joffe Tuesday, May 12, 2015
article
by Ken Jowitt Tuesday, May 12, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Ralph Peters Tuesday, May 12, 2015
article
by Bing West Wednesday, May 27, 2015
article
Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Issue 22

How will new gas and oil production affect, if at all, America’s military and geostrategic role abroad?

Background Essay

by Williamson Murray Wednesday, March 25, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Kori Schake Thursday, March 26, 2015
article
by Walter Russell Mead Thursday, March 26, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Monday, March 30, 2015
article
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Issue 21

What additional future steps should the United States and Europe take, if any at all, to counter Russian ambitions?

Background Essay

by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, February 26, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Paul R. Gregory Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Max Boot Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Frederick W. Kagan Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Williamson Murray Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Ralph Peters Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
by Barry Strauss Wednesday, February 18, 2015
article
Friday, December 19, 2014

Issue 20

How might the U.S. reboot its Middle East policy and restore confidence in U.S. power and influence?

Background Essay

by Joshua Muravchik Friday, December 19, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Kimberly Kagan Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Colonel Joseph (Joe) Felter (ret.) Friday, December 19, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Walter Russell Mead Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Kori Schake Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Barry Strauss Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Bing West Friday, December 19, 2014
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Tuesday, February 17, 2015
article

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Strategika – “NATO: The Once And Future Alliance” With Peter Mansoor

interview with Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

How NATO has survived—and will continue to prosper—in the post–Cold War era. Military historian Peter Mansoor explains the historical trajectory of NATO, how it adjusted after the demise of the Soviet Union, and why it will survive the current threats from Vladimir Putin’s Russia.

Related Commentary

Where Is NATO’s Military Headed?

by Bing West via Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Peter Mansoor concluded his overview of NATO by writing, “fear of Russian revanchism has served as inspiration for the maintenance of a healthy military relationship among NATO allies… a pivotal, stabilizing role in European security, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.”

Strategika – “Will the West Still Fight?” With Josef Joffe

interview with Josef Joffevia Strategika
Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Have the United States and Europe simply run out of steam?

Related Commentary

Defending the Indefensible: NATO’s Baltic States

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Expanding NATO to include the Baltic nations of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia was a moral imperative and politically irresistible. Militarily, it was folly.

Featured Commentary

A Refashioned NATO

by Ken Jowittvia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

NATO’s character and mission were clearly delineated at its inception. Its mission was to countervail Soviet military power, specifically an attack on Western Europe. The fixed focus was the Fulda Gap.

Featured Commentary

Europe To The World: “Count Me Out!”

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

World Order, Henry Kissinger muses in his eponymous book, requires somebody—a state or an institution—to maintain it. He holds up the Westphalian System, put in place after the murderous Thirty Years’ War, as one institutional pillar. As another instance, he cites the Congress of Vienna (1815), which spawned the Quadruple as well as the Holy Alliance.

Podcast: Strategika – “Will the West Still Fight?” With Josef Joffe
Background Essay

Whither NATO?

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Formed in 1949 in response to the onset of the Cold War, the purpose of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, according to British General Hastings Lionel Ismay, the first Secretary General of the alliance, was “to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.” Sixty-five years after the creation of NATO, little it seems has changed with the exception...

Podcast: Strategika – “NATO: The Once And Future Alliance” With Peter Mansoor

Strategika: “More Energy, Fewer Problems?” with Williamson Murray

interview with Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Tuesday, March 31, 2015

The economic and strategic implications of the US energy boom.

Strategika: “An Abundant Energy Future?” With Walter Russell Mead

interview with Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Tuesday, March 31, 2015

How will new energy resources affect America’s standing in the world?

Strategika: “Energy Resources: A Curse or a Blessing?” with Kori Schake

interview with Kori Schakevia Strategika
Tuesday, March 31, 2015

What the United States’ energy revolution means for the nation’s future.

Pages


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

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