Strategika

Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

Issue 19

What is the likely trajectory of Chinese-Japanese tensions and how will the United States be affected?
Background Essay
Background Essay

Chinese-Japanese Tensions and Its Strategic Logic

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

The recent tensions between China and Japan are threatening to bring the world’s top three economies—the United States, China, and Japan—into a major armed confrontation.

Podcast: Strategika – “Chinese-Japanese Tensions” with Miles Maochun Yu
Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

The Main Obstacle

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

As in previous millennia of history, China’s objective for its periphery—the East Asia/Western Pacific region—is subordination of some kind or degree. Japan, being the only indigenous major power in the region, and allied formally with the United States (Russia having ceased to be an Asian power), is the main obstacle to that desired suzerainty.

Podcast: Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla
Featured Commentary

Japan’s Pivotal Position

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

If underlying geopolitical factors are the overriding cause of the recent decline in relations between China and Japan, then the current trajectory is likely to persist, for there is little reason to believe that those factors will change.

Podcast: Strategika – “China and Japan: A Tense Equilibrium” with Mark Moyar
E.g., 11 / 27 / 2014
E.g., 11 / 27 / 2014
Monday, November 10, 2014

Issue 19

What is the likely trajectory of Chinese-Japanese tensions and how will the United States be affected?

Background Essay

by Miles Maochun Yu Monday, November 10, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Monday, November 10, 2014
article
by Mark Moyar Monday, November 10, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Monday, November 10, 2014
article
by Miles Maochun Yu Monday, November 10, 2014
article
Monday, September 1, 2014

Issue 18

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Background Essay

by Andrew Roberts Monday, September 1, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Thomas H. Henriksen Monday, September 1, 2014
article
by Kori Schake Monday, September 1, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Peter Berkowitz Tuesday, September 16, 2014
article
by Peter Berkowitz Wednesday, August 6, 2014
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, September 11, 2014
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Wednesday, August 20, 2014
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, August 5, 2014
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, July 29, 2014
article
by Edward N. Luttwak Sunday, July 20, 2014
article
by Bruce Thornton Monday, July 21, 2014
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, April 8, 2014
article
Poster Collection, US 4642, Hoover Institution Archives.
Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Issue 16

What will be the immediate strategic repercussions, if any, of the scheduled radical pruning of the size of the American military?

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Strategika – “China and Japan: A Tense Equilibrium” with Mark Moyar

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Why Chinese-Japanese tensions are unlikely to dissipate soon—and why that may prove dangerous.

Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Explaining the nature of Chinese ambition in East Asia.

Strategika – “Chinese-Japanese Tensions” with Miles Maochun Yu

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Exploring a history of animosity between two Asian giants.

Featured Commentary

Japan’s Pivotal Position

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

If underlying geopolitical factors are the overriding cause of the recent decline in relations between China and Japan, then the current trajectory is likely to persist, for there is little reason to believe that those factors will change.

Podcast: Strategika – “China and Japan: A Tense Equilibrium” with Mark Moyar
Featured Commentary

The Main Obstacle

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

As in previous millennia of history, China’s objective for its periphery—the East Asia/Western Pacific region—is subordination of some kind or degree. Japan, being the only indigenous major power in the region, and allied formally with the United States (Russia having ceased to be an Asian power), is the main obstacle to that desired suzerainty.

Podcast: Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla
Background Essay

Chinese-Japanese Tensions and Its Strategic Logic

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

The recent tensions between China and Japan are threatening to bring the world’s top three economies—the United States, China, and Japan—into a major armed confrontation.

Podcast: Strategika – “Chinese-Japanese Tensions” with Miles Maochun Yu
Related Commentary

The Trajectory of North Pacific Tensions

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

Korea is the ever-sharpening focus of the growing tensions between China and Japan because moving Korea out of the security alliance led by the U.S. and Japan is the proximate objective of China’s grand design for the North Pacific.

Related Commentary

The Ultimate Trajectory of Chinese-Japanese Tensions

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

Chinese-Japanese tensions are partly a corollary to the century-old bilateral animosity beginning with the Sino-Japanese War of 1894.

Strategika: “Reasons for Hope: How Arab Countries Can Advance the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process” with Kori Schake

interview with Kori Schakevia Strategika
Friday, October 10, 2014

Why there is still hope for progress despite recent violence

Strategika: “Mowing the Grass: Why Half-Measures Won’t Solve the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict” with Thomas Henriksen

interview with Thomas H. Henriksenvia Strategika
Friday, October 10, 2014

Why Israel’s current approach to Palestinian violence can never lead to peace.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

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Strategika is a new online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.