Military History/Contemporary Conflict Working Group

Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict

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Traditional Naval Bases Still Matter

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Wednesday, January 21, 2015

The importance of naval bases—hence the need to protect them—and the extraordinary efforts required to make up for bases lost, ranks high among the many lessons of which the month of January should remind persons concerned with America’s military viability.

Featured Commentary

Remembering The Last Lion

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Fifty years ago this Saturday, former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill died at age 90.

Is Iran an Ally or Enemy?

by Bing West via Analysis
Saturday, January 17, 2015

In Syria, the besieged government of the Assad regime clings to about half of the territory, while Sunni factions fight over the other half. In Iraq, the Shiites control the south, the Kurds control the northeast, and the Sunnis in the northwest are controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The Sykes-Picot division of Mesopotamia no longer exists, except in the minds of Obama White House operatives who will leave a full-scale disaster to the next administration.

Excerpt of Poster Collection, INT 74.12, Hoover Institution Archives.
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Who Is Bargaining With Whom?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Friday, January 16, 2015

In mid-January 2015, as we may be entering a more intense phase of the civilizational conflict that has characterized our century, Henry Kissinger’s capstone book, World Order, perpetuates a legacy of strategic thought centered on resolving major conflicts through grand bargains pursued through complex signals.

Poster Collection, INT 338, Hoover Institution Archives.
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Time of The Assassins, Or of The Jackals?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 13, 2015

The first week of January 2015’s biggest news—three Muslim jihadists murdering a dozen journalists in their Paris office, another killing four patrons in a nearby Kosher market, and the reactions to these events—leads us to ask what history may teach us about such people and how we may rid ourselves of them.

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Strategika–“Understanding the Threat from Radical Islam” with Joshua Muravchik

with Joshua Muravchik via Strategika
Friday, January 9, 2015

Why combating terrorism requires moral clarity.

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Strategika–“Undermining the Islamist Ideology” with Col. Joseph Felter

interview with Colonel Joseph (Joe) Felter (ret.)via Strategika
Friday, January 9, 2015

How the West can combat the root causes of terrorism.

Interviews

Joseph Felter on the John Batchelor Show (19:17)

interview with Colonel Joseph (Joe) Felter (ret.)via John Batchelor Show
Thursday, January 8, 2015

Research Fellow Joseph Felter discusses his most recent piece in Strategika on the John Batchelor Show.

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Ceasefire in Colombia

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Monday, December 22, 2014

This week, diplomats from the United Nations and the European Union are hailing the unilateral ceasefire declared by the leftist FARC as the harbinger of a peace that will permanently end a conflict dating back to the 1960s.

What Terrorism Could Have in Store for America

by Mark Moyarvia Analysis
Friday, December 19, 2014

The scarcity of significant terrorist attacks in recent years has led Americans to assume that the days of mass casualty attacks are in the past. But history teaches us to beware of the assumption that recent trends foretell the future. Americans are paying insufficient attention to unexpected events in which terrorists inflict serious harm on the United States.

Pages

From left to right: Bing West, Peter Mansoor, Ralph Peters, Victor Davis Hanson

Military History Working Group meets at Hoover

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict met for a workshop during October 7 and 8 to chart its long-term objectives and review its new online journal, Strategika.

News

The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts. 


As the very name of Hoover Institution attests, military history lies at the very core of our dedication to the study of "War, Revolution, and Peace." Indeed, the precise mission statement of the Hoover Institution includes the following promise: "The overall mission of this Institution is, from its records, to recall the voice of experience against the making of war, and by the study of these records and their publication, to recall man's endeavors to make and preserve peace, and to sustain for America the safeguards of the American way of life." From its origins as a library and archive, the Hoover Institution has evolved into one of the foremost research centers in the world for policy formation and pragmatic analysis. It is with this tradition in mind, that the "Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict" has set its agenda—reaffirming the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. By bringing together a diverse group of distinguished military historians, security analysts, and military veterans and practitioners, the working group seeks to examine the conflicts of the past as critical lessons for the present.

Victor Davis Hanson on War in the Contemporary World — WATCH

The careful study of military history offers a way of analyzing modern war and peace that is often underappreciated in this age of technological determinism. Yet the result leads to a more in-depth and dispassionate understanding of contemporary wars, one that explains how particular military successes and failures of the past can be often germane, sometimes misunderstood, or occasionally irrelevant in the context of the present.

The working group is chaired by Victor Davis Hanson with counsel from Bruce S. Thornton and David L. Berkey, along with collaboration form the group’s distinguished scholars, military historians, analysts, journalists, and military officers.