Henry I. Miller

Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy
Biography: 

Henry I. Miller, MS, MD, is the Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy at the Hoover Institution. His research focuses on public policy toward science and technology, encompassing a number of areas, including pharmaceutical development, genetic engineering in agriculture, models for regulatory reform, and the emergence of new viral diseases.

Miller served for fifteen years at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in a number of posts. He was the medical reviewer for the first genetically engineered drugs to be evaluated by the FDA and thus instrumental in the rapid licensing of human insulin and human growth hormone. Thereafter, he was a special assistant to the FDA commissioner and the founding director of the FDA's Office of Biotechnology. During his government service, Miller participated frequently on various expert and policy panels as a representative of the FDA or the US government. As a government official, Miller received numerous awards and citations.

Since coming to the Hoover Institution, Miller has become well known not only for his contributions to scholarly journals but also for his articles and books that make science, medicine, and technology accessible. His work has been widely published in many languages. Monographs include Policy Controversy in Biotechnology: An Insider's View; To America's Health: A Model for Reform of the Food and Drug Administration; and The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution. Barron's selected The Frankenfood Myth as one of the 25 Best Books of 2004. In addition, Miller has published extensively in a wide spectrum of scholarly journals and popular publications worldwide, including The Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, the Nature family of journals, Chronicle of Higher Education, Forbes, National Review, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, the Guardian, Defining Ideas, and the Financial Times. He is a regulator contributor to Forbes.com and frequently appears on the nationally syndicated radio programs of John Batchelor and Lars Larson.

Miller was selected by the editors of Nature Biotechnology as one of the people who had made the "most significant contributions" to biotechnology during the previous decade. He serves on numerous editorial boards.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

water
Featured Commentary

CDC Errs On Policy As Well As Handling Dangerous Pathogens

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes.com
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The agency’s reactive approach to Legionnaires’ disease causes thousands of preventable infections every year.

Featured Commentary

Why the Buzz About a Bee-Pocalypse Is a Honey Trap

by Henry I. Millervia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

On June 20 the White House issued a presidential memorandum creating a Pollinator Health Task Force and ordering the Environmental Protection Agency to "assess the effect of pesticides, including neonicotinoids, on bee and other pollinator health and take action, as appropriate."

Featured Commentary

California's Drought

by Henry I. Millervia National Review Online
Thursday, July 17, 2014

Last year was the driest on record in California, and 2014 could well set another record. Most of the state is experiencing “extreme” drought — the second-most severe category.

Poverty in the US
Featured Commentary

Wealthy Activist Vandana Shiva Is A Poor Advocate For The Poor

by Henry I. Miller, Drew L. Kershenvia Forbes.com
Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Vandana Shiva advocates policies that will inflict widespread poverty, malnutrition, and death on the very people she claims to champion. And she’s no friend of the environment, either.

Gene-spliced Crops for the Dry Years

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Farms enrich California and feed much of the world. They also drink up most of the state’s water. Crops bred to be less thirsty could save the harvest.

Featured Commentary

The Brave Old World of Genetic Engineering

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes.com
Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Even after two decades of stunning scientific, humanitarian and financial successes and an admirable record of safety, the application of genetic engineering (GE) to agriculture is still beleaguered by activists and over-regulated by bureaucrats. 

Featured Commentary

The Meningitis Outbreak We Weren't Ready For

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

During the last two years, there have been a couple of outbreaks and sporadic cases of bacterial meningitis that federal health agencies failed to address with sufficient aggressiveness. It could have been much worse, and the experience should serve as a wake-up call

Featured Commentary

Another Obama Cabinet Member Falls Short

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes.com
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

President Obama’s mounting scandals and plummeting approval ratings illustrate the old maxim that life is tough, and it’s even tougher if you’re stupid—as so many administration officials have shown themselves to be.

Featured Commentary

Greens and Genes

by Henry I. Millervia Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 27, 2014

In her Political Diary item on June 26, Allysia Finley wrote that California has "insane water rationing" policies and that Californians "pay dearly for their government's green sanctimony."

Featured Commentary

You Can't Sugarcoat Distasteful Legislation

by Henry I. Miller, Jeff Stiervia Forbes
Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Obesity is a public health time bomb in young as well as older Americans. 

Pages